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Like a lot of memories, some of the details are foggy. These images are from sometime around 2000, when Oscar de la Renta visited our Seattle flagship upon the launch of one of his fragrance collections. The snapshots of the designer and our employees were taken at a luncheon that preceded an in-store appearance.

And while the date of this particular moment is lost, what remains—what will always remain—is how the designer made us feel.

“Mr. de la Renta was the consummate gentleman in the industry; he understood how to make women look and feel beautiful. His work created a visual fantasy of sorts, but always with a nod to realism so you could be confident and enjoy the moment. His work was never confused with any other designer as it had a true signature: subtle but always recognizable in shape, pattern, color and construction. He also was one of the first brave American couturiers to explore beyond evening into sportswear, although he was always known for his beautiful evening pieces. The definition of couture was in transition in the ’80s; the French previously owned the category, but Mr. de la Renta gave credibility to American couture and elevated it, not just in terms of the quality of his collections and his construction, but also because he was so charismatic and charming.” —Sue Patneaude, Executive Vice President, Designer Women’s Apparel (retired)

“What I remember about meeting Oscar de la Renta in 2002 is his smile and quiet elegance.” —Kylie Allensworth, Internal Communications Director

“Mr. de la Renta was the first guest designer to come into the Jeffrey Fashion Cares fund-raiser in Atlanta. He was amazing that night with all of his fans; he was such a gentleman in every way.” —Jeffrey Kalinsky, Vice President, Designer Fashion Director

“What’s amazing about Oscar is that his reach went beyond his own collection. He had such influence on and was such a positive role model for American designers. Not that they ever tried to be him, but he was so well thought of. The biggest compliment to him, and to the business he built, is that women wear his clothes because they make them feel beautiful and feminine; his brand can continue because there is such a strong sense of what Oscar de la Renta stands for. We just had a big luncheon for Oscar de la Renta clients here in Seattle. He was not here for that, but his business has never been bigger or better. Even though the brand has been around since the late ’60s, it remains relevant, and I think that says something.” —Jennifer Wheeler, Vice President, Corporate Merchandise Manager, Women’s Designer Apparel

Image via New York Times

As of November, party season is in full swing. To give you a leg up on the hyper-social months to come, The Thread partnered with our Restaurants Division and Wit & Wonder Gifts team to offer ideas and inspiration for holiday entertaining—from drinks and dessert to décor and gifts.

Our chefs and blog editor take the stress out of planning a full-course menu that’s memorable (in a good way) and won’t keep you stuck in the kitchen all night. In the weeks to come, we’re serving up six perfectly paired, delicious recipes in a special What’s Cooking series. First up, two easy-to-make cocktails to get your party started—our take on an of-the-moment favorite and a citrusy number with a spicy, smoky surprise.

Nor'Easter Moscow Mule-inspired bourbon cocktail recipe from Nordstrom; photo by Jeff Powell.

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October 24, 2014

Listen Up! Elisa Ambrogio

Superstition can be a powerful motivator. Black cats, walking under ladders, knocking on wood, broken mirrors…these and other superstitions seem to cause seemingly logical people to do some seriously weird things.

Well, lump us in that category because since we started posting Halloween-ish videos at the beginning of the month, we’ve decided it would be bad luck if we didn’t continue down that path—at least until next Friday, anyway.

And while today’s pick reads a bit more Scary Movie than Scream, it’s still totally spellbinding, thanks to the charming Elisa Ambrogio.

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On the short list of things based in Seattle: Nordstrom, and director Lynn Shelton. Okay, so that’s the very short list, but the geographical coupling is a recently significant one. While the movie industry churns on in Los Angeles and New York, the Cannes-featured, Sundance Special Jury Prize-winning filmmaker stays put. Her most recent must-see, Laggies, takes place in the Emerald City—and, in part, at Nordstrom. We spoke with Shelton about shooting the upcoming film in her hometown, and we dished leading ladies, fashion choices on-camera and off, and those ever-natty Mad Men.

THE THREAD: Okay so, Half-Yearly Sale? New shoes? What brings Keira Knightley and Chloë Moretz’s characters into Nordstrom?
Lynn Shelton: There’s a little scene at the beginning, where they’re in the store’s entryway with a couple of guy friends, [but the main scene involves] Keira’s character going with Chloë’s to find prom dresses. The scene ends up being very dramatic; Chloë ends up storming out.

I understand you really lobbied to get the film shot in Seattle.
We’d been talking about Atlanta and L.A. and all these other places. As a Seattle-based filmmaker, I get special satisfaction out of things being really geographically specific. When they’re at the Northgate Nordstrom, that’s exactly where they would’ve gone for prom dresses. Later, they crash a car near the mall and end up at the North Seattle Police Department. It was so wonderful that Nordstrom let us shoot there. That’s the mall I grew up in. We went there all the time.

Style is often as definitive as location. What’s the style like in Laggies?
It really is all about the characters. I’ve never made a film that had a different objective than this, but this is a film where I wanted the characters to feel real. It was like the apartments and the houses that these people lived in were real, too. This was not aspirational living like in some films, where characters have a simple job but they live in a crazy mansion. Keira’s character was floating along. She wears outfits that she doesn’t stick out in—though trying to make Keira Knightley not stick out in a crowd? That’s a tall order. To be not supermodel gorgeous, but instead like a real human being, she really dressed down.

Chloë’s character is 16 years old. She has a very retro vibe. She listens to ’70s music. We had her in flare jeans and some vintage pieces, like old leather jackets. She’s an au naturale girl. We had fun with her in terms of her having that kind of teenage experimentation. Every day she wore something a little bit different.

So you had Keira Knightley, this amazing personality who’s known for her style and grace, but you needed to dress her down. Way down.
Yes! One of the outfits was a white T-shirt and Levi’s. We had her playing around on a skateboard. Kind of tomboy-ish. There’s also a scene where she goes to her friend’s wedding brunch and wears a navy cardigan and a plain little skirt with little flats, an iconic look. Also, her dad’s a tax accountant, and she takes a temporary gig as his sign twirler. The uniform for that is white jeans and a white shirt and white Keds. Her hair was back. She looked very natural, a no-makeup look. We had her on the street, right on the corner. Cars were just going by her. Not a single person noticed it was her.

What was her style like on-set? Tell us she at least showed up in some great pieces?
Keira likes to dress up. She definitely obviously does an incredible job of that when she does it. But I’ve got to tell you, more often than not she would come to set in baggy overalls and a T-shirt, and that was adorable—I mean adorable. She can just pull anything off. She is one of the most down-to-earth people I’ve ever met. When it’s not dress-up time, she wants to be comfortable. She does have those opportunities to really go over the top—for galas, on set—but she’s somebody who just really likes to be comfortable and is comfortable in her own skin.

As for Chloë, jeans and jackets and funkiness were her personal everyday look. She had a lot of opinions about what her character would wear. Chloë was similar in a lot of ways to what her character, Annika, is like.

Let’s switch platforms. You’ve done some television, too; what was it like directing an episode of Mad Men, when work becomes this impeccably and specific well-dressed environment?
It’s a total time capsule. You’re thrust into this whole other era. And then, just on the other side of their acting space, you’re looking at this crew of people wearing hoodies; fifty people just on the outside of the frame who all look casual. It’s very funny to be in those extremes.

What about with New Girl?
Zooey [Deschanel]’s look on her show is so awesome. Her character, Jess, definitely has a style, but it includes a lot of really fun, playful looks. She can be sexy, but she can also be in flannel PJs with little cherries on them. You’re always looking to see what’s next.

I also directed episode four of the current season of The Mindy Project. Mindy Kaling is really into fashion. She has really specific ideas about the things she wants her character to wear. I got to see her Emmy dress before she went on to present for the Emmys and had a lot of conversations with her about that dress.

And what about your own look? What are you craving for the fall season?
I always want new boots. That’s an obsession for me, along with the other 90 percent of women in this country. And I definitely need a new coat, too. There are a lot of things that I covet, for sure. I keep having different premieres and red carpet events to go to!

—Bibi Deitz
Laggies film stills shot on location at Nordstrom by Barbara Kinney
Laggies opens nationwide on October 24.

Make what’s under the table as scintillating as the conversation above.


Diane von Furstenberg ‘Lara’ Wedge Sandal
| Manolo Blahnik ‘Miramar’ Stud Sandal

Frame Denim and Nordstrom joined up to make a big splash back in January, when leggy women everywhere scissored into the Pop-In for the Karlie Kloss-designed capsule collection as well as an expanded selection of Frame goods that included white denim overalls and rad shirts and jackets. Suffice it to say the whole denim-on-denim look went next-level.

The Los Angeles-based, Los Angeles-made line continues to chicly assert itself as a go-to for the kind of girl who fancies a pointy flat and a simple black t-shirt with her slim-fits. The kind of girl, that is, who fancies Hanneli Mustaparta as the ultimate style icon.

The model, blogger and street style frequent flier kicks off Frame’s #GIRLSINFRAME video campaign. To see the rest of the series—for barefoot dance party grooves, low-key/high-style outfit tips and general mood-boosting—plug in your earphones and …

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Our Director of Creative Projects and Pop-In Shop Curator Olivia Kim offers up her OK’d by O.K. product picks, inspiration and things she’s super in love with right now.


Opening Ceremony Grunge Slip-On Platform Sneaker

“Love the Cali-cool vibe of these ’90s-inspo’d sneaks!”

Pop-In@Nordstrom Welcomes I.T: We collaborated with Hong Kong fashion collective I.T to bring brands izzue, :CHOCOOLATE, Mini Cream and Aape by A BATHING APE to the U.S. for the first time.

You’ve seen the Hong Kong cult brands that comprise our new Pop-In Shop in motion (thanks to our moving lookbooks), but have you experienced them up close and personal? Keep reading for a list of the eight Nordstrom locations where you can Pop-In in person, and to see a snapshot of what’s in store—as photographed at our Seattle flagship.

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Fall marches on! The new season has been here for a few weeks already, sure, but for the sartorially inclined, the shift is about more than just lower temps or fewer hours of daylight—it’s about watching the parade-like stream of new arrivals.

Here comes a lovely example right now: a set of ink-hued, just-released styles from SJP Collection.

(L to R): Florence crossbody, Beekman clutch, Blythe T-strap pump, Daphne pump, New Yorker hobo and Crosstown crossbody.

The latest shoes and bags from the fashion-loving mind of Sarah Jessica Parker continue the classic-meets-sexy vibe we’ve already grown to love from the nascent label—now refreshed with new details like mirrored metallic finishes or saturated colors, like indigo and cobalt blue.

Keep reading to get your eyes on some of SJP’s top picks from the new collection, plus a little outfit inspiration, courtesy of the actress/designer’s recent whistle-stop tour of select Nordstrom stores.

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We liked last week’s spooktacular video so much, we’re keeping the Halloween theme going with this week’s pick: a slightly creepy (and 100% cool) video from enigmatic experimental Swedish band Goat. In the Sam Macon–directed clip for Goats’ psych-folk single “Hide from the Sun,” a beautiful woman is transformed into an otherworldly queen by a cast of animal-like beings, all of which were dreamt up by L.A.–based artist Stacey Rozich.

The ultra-talented Rozich—whose colorful style you might recognize from album art for other bands, such as Earth and Kaylee Cole, or for her spot-on representations of common music-fest personae for Refinery29—happens to be a buddy and was nice enough to answer our questions about her work, the video and more.

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