Fashion Week

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Photos by Kristin Yamada

Copenhagen Fashion Week wrapped up last week, but great style never really leaves the Scandinavian metropolis. So many independent fashion designers have their headquarters there, amid the design centers, schools and architecture offices that heavily populate Denmark’s capital. On an average day, the fashions on its residents are enviably cool in a kicked-back way. But when the fashion world descends on this small country, it makes for serious street-style spotting.

Here are just a few looks from CFW that we plan on emulating, and here’s how.

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For lots of brands—particularly those in the emerging designer realm—the runway is no longer on the runway. More and more forward thinkers are walking away from the traditional conventions of Fashion Week and doing their own versions of theater, presentation, experience and the big reveal.

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Scenes of Olivia Kim and the crew in Koché’s runway/alleyway during the fall shows in March.

Here’s an amazing example: when SPACE designer Christelle Kocher unveiled Koché’s current collection in Paris last March, she did so not in a staid, classroomlike setting but in a bustling, multilingual alleyway in the middle of the city.

The result felt something like the French version of a glamorous flash mob, with the pranksters dressed in patchwork velvet and bejeweled tomboy silhouettes. We’re lucky enough to have video footage of it—in anticipation of the next season of Paris Fashion Week. We’re sharing it here.

CHECK OUT THIS VIDEO

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Of course the fashions are the main attraction, but the actual runway is frequently just as artfully constructed. Maisons and designers don’t let their visions end at the dress’s hem; many make universes within which to present their collections, to the delight of the lucky few who get to attend their shows.

A new book put out by Irish lifestyle group Roads captures this fleeting art form. The Fashion Set: The Art of the Fashion Show presents 10 years of the most memorable, outlandish and groundbreaking set designs in the modern history of fashion.

Fendi SS 2008 show

Fendi Spring/Summer 2008. Photo by Vincent Lappartient, courtesy of Roads Publishing.

In his introduction to the 200-plus-page tome of beautiful photos thoughtfully contextualized, Italian editor Federico Poletti describes the project as an attempt to celebrate the “miniature world that has been carefully planned and constructed, only to suddenly vanish after just twelve spectacular minutes.” The temporality of these performances lends to their special status, as well as the privilege of the audience. Fashion shows are notoriously difficult to access, and this book appeals to our desire for inclusion in the most rarified circles.

Sometimes grand, as in Karl Lagerfeld’s Fendi Spring 2008 show on China’s Great Wall, fashion sets can tap into global historical or artistic influences. Or, as in the case of Henrik Vibskov’s Fall 2015 show titled “The Messy Massage Class,” they may explore, tongue in cheek, smaller social themes like our preoccupation with health services.

Henri Vibskov AW 2015 showHenrik Vibskov Autumn/Winter 2015. Photo by Alastair Philip Wiper, courtesy of Roads Publishing.

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Copenhagen Fashion Week

Danes do street style with a dash of contemporary Nordic cool. Our global trend reporter Kristin Yamada aimed her trusty lens at some of the sleekest looking Scandinavians and visiting fashion folks during Copenhagen Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2017. Here are our favorite shots from her time on the ground in Denmark.

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One thing fashion is not necessarily known for is practicality. Especially during the haute couture displays of Fashion Week, when the sky is the limit for designers’ imaginations and the shoes models sport to walk the runway are equally as elevated, one doesn’t see much emphasis placed on comfortable wearability.

During recent Fashion Weeks, however, one trend that literally hit the streets of New York, London, Paris and Milan was the sneaker. Some of the most stylish women and men in the industry were sporting tennies as they rushed to runway shows. It’s the ways in which they wear them that make these sneaks chic.

Spring 2016 Street Style sneakers

Images by InDigital

Here are some of our favorite styles and street style shots paired with shoes you can shop now.

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Every once in a while you come across a set of fashion images that you just want to live inside. You want to be the girl, to explore her landscape, you want—most of all—to wear her clothes.
That’s what happened to me the first time I saw Victor Alfaro‘s pre-fall lookbook. When I had the chance to meet him during Paris Fashion Week, I was hooked.
victor_alfaro_nordstrom_pre_fall2All lookbook images courtesy Victor Alfaro. And how about this 3-in-1 convertible trench?!
There’s something so classically New York about Victor’s style, which makes sense—the Mexican-born designer has lived there since the ’80s. And he just seems to understand what women are looking for from season to season. He’s all about layering, and building a wardrobe of looks that will work together for a nice, long time.
He’s also about an edgy jolt and an industrial urban setting. When we asked him to share his evocative pre-fall images with us, he happily complied, then told us all about the collection—and how Taylor Swift figures in. (Or, well … doesn’t.)

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Bag charm at Fashion Week

Strapped to the side of some of Fashion Week’s most fashionable ladies were assorted oddball accessories. Although their luxe handbags needed no frippery, many chose to outfit them with a little bauble. After all, these are women who don’t miss an opportunity to dress up. And these trinkets aren’t without their charms.

Bag charms have become a popular statement for the fashion set. Spotted on models like Lara Stone and Kendall Jenner, these playful accessories for accessories let wearers add some personality to their purses.

Bag charm at Fashion Week

Many of these bag charms take the shape of furry characters. Fendi has a Pompom Karl, a miniature Karl Lagerfeld doll ensconced in a fluffy tuft. British designer Sophie Hulme‘s quirky bag charms have become collectibles among those into the trend. You’ll find furry, feathered, tasseled and jeweled characters among her menagerie of creations. Burberry has a high-style teddy bear charm. Many designers, like Rebecca Minkoff and Stella McCartney, make tiny versions of their own handbags into charms, as though your purse seems naked without its own purse.

SEE MORE AND SHOP OUR BAG CHARM SLIDESHOW

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Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne of DKNY

One of the most exciting fashion announcements in recent years was the news that Public School’s streetwise designers Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne would share the creative director role at DKNY following Donna Karan’s retirement. While amused surprise was the initial public reaction, the industry registered how well-suited Chow and Osborne were to steering DKNY. The two New Yorkers were already critical darlings—winning the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund for their own label, Public School, where they mix streetwear with crisply tailored athletic gear. Even Public School’s palette corresponds with the power colors of DKNY. Anticipation for their spring 2016 debut collection at the helm of the established house quickly followed.

Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne of DKNY

Begun in 1989, DKNY is the faster, younger arm of Donna Karan Collection. It favors sportswear, workwear and separates that can be mixed and matched to create a full wardrobe. Its essence is modern—casual but professional. In the ’90s, DKNY dressed models of the moment like Shalom Harlow and Esther Cañadas in what the label referred to as “the official uniform of New York.” With the onset of the current ’90s nostalgia, Opening Ceremony released a capsule DKNY collection in 2013 with Cara Delevingne as its spokesmodel. Insiders knew that Chow and Osborne—with their own celebrity following and New York roots–were the duo to usher in a new heyday for the label.

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How to Wear Turtlenecks

On account of the modest neckline, cloaking capabilities and hickey-hiding potential, turtlenecks have a reputation as a conservative clothing choice. But as these street-style stars show, that dull distinction is unwarranted. Turtlenecks can be sexy and daring, and are easily introduced as a foundational piece in the edgiest outfits.

Turtleneck looks spotted at Fashion WeekMany famous folks sport turtlenecks—check out this Tumblr for hilarious proof. But forget Steve Jobs’ basic black top. Ignore Kim Kardashian’s rubber numbers. Whether plain or as a layer in a carefully constructed look, turtlenecks are this season’s transitional piece.

Fashion Week offered plenty evidence that this classic shirt is keeping it cool.

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A while back we told you about a cool social media contest called Clergerie Girls, in which the man-repelling style icon Leandra Medine would team up with Robert Clergerie creative director Roland Mouret to select an Instagram-sourced collaborator for the beloved line of oxfords, wedges, slides and sandals. 

robert_clergerie_man_repeller_nordstrom_leandra_katy_use_this_oneMan Repeller’s Leandra Medine, Robert Clergerie creative director Roland Mouret and Katy Shayne—ultimate Clergerie Girl
(All party images courtesy Robert Clergerie)

Just before we all convened for Paris Fashion Week, the lucky gal was named—and toward the end of the trip, we got a chance to see the brand’s fall 2016 collection and celebrate at a star-studded, especially well-shod dinner party with these smart, thoughtful women of style.

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