Runway Shows

This last month has been a whirl—one filled with designer platforms, reams of fringe, handbags the size of suitcases and crayon-colored eyeshadow. All of these glamorous things have left us in a swivet, and we’re suffering a bout of fashion fatigue from keeping up with the runway shows and street style. It’s a complicated self-diagnosis but, we’re assured, completely curable.

So once again we turned to Kate Bellman, associate fashion director in our Nordstrom Fashion Office, to distill the runway’s biggest trends for fall 2017. Because if someone were to ask us, our response would sound like nonsensical Elton John song lyrics: “blue jeans, baby; rocket ships; crocodile shoes and rhinestone sunglasses.” See what we mean?

Maison Margiela Fall 2017

Maison Margiela Fall 2017

Thank goodness for Kate! Here’s her professional breakdown of the last four weeks—plus our on-trend shopping picks. Sing along if you want to!

SEE AND SHOP THE TRENDS

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Some of the most advanced style in Milan this week came via the makeup and hair on the runway. While there were still shows that embraced the no-makeup makeup trend that has been prevalent in recent seasons, this is Italy, and glamour has rarely been barefaced on the Boot.

Emilio Pucci, Fall 2017

Photos by Indigital Images

We’ve rounded up some of the coolest, prettiest and most translatable trends we saw on the catwalk, plus picked out the tools to achieve the looks. Be it neon lashes, ’60s bouffants, primary-colored highlights or iridescent eyes, these bold beauty techniques are worth a try.

LOOK RUNWAY-READY: HERE’S HOW

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Alessandro Michele is bringing haberdashery back—among so many other seemingly lost arts.

The designer’s fall 2017 runway show was once again an abundant display of his far-flung influences–and we mean that as the highest praise. Michele, who refers to collections as a “new story” or “chapter,” can seem downright pedantic in the obscurities he digs up. This season one could cite–if one ventured to–entomology, Orientalism, Jane Austen and AC/DC as just some of the references this weaver of worlds and garments wrought throughout his collection. And there are likely other more esoteric inspirations that informed him.

Gucci Fall 2017

Photos by Indigital Images

Although accessories like chain mail, rhinestone glasses, Gucci chest tattoos and manacled clutches were also on full display, this season his hats seemed the most wearable and wonderful. And we’re not talking the headscarves and headbands–or the hairstyles that looked like helmets–all of which were plenty, too.

From Hardee hats to turbans to balaclavas to chullos, here are some of the toppers that show why Michele’s brand of nostalgia is completely forward-looking–and not just old hat.

HANG ON TO YOUR, EH: SEE THE SLIDESHOW

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After the whirlwind of runways this New York Fashion Week, we looked to our Fashion Office to tell us what exactly happened. When it comes to fall 2017, what will we be wearing? What are the big takeaways for the season? What do we need to know? Um, help.

Associate Fashion Director Kate Bellman sifted through the crazy, beautiful style this season, breaking it down to six need-to-know trends. With our sights newly focused, we then took the liberty of rounding up some styles that you can shop—and wear—now.

 Twisted Tradition

Public School New York Fall 2017

Public School, fall 2017; photo by Indigital Images 

This Fashion Week, one of the biggest looks on the runway involved reworked classic menswear. Prep codes were reinvented with generous proportions and masculine/feminine mash-ups. Tailoring introduced deconstructed layers to make suits look modern and streetwise. Androgynous hats, tweeds, checks and pinstripes all appeared on runways as distinct as Public School, Victoria Beckham, Michael Kors and Proenza Schouler.

Shop the trend now:

Public School stripe cotton shirtdressTibi removable strap stripe shirtdress | Victoria Beckham asymmetrical cotton shirt

READ MORE: AN ABRIDGED VERSION OF NYFW

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Of course the fashions are the main attraction, but the actual runway is frequently just as artfully constructed. Maisons and designers don’t let their visions end at the dress’s hem; many make universes within which to present their collections, to the delight of the lucky few who get to attend their shows.

A new book put out by Irish lifestyle group Roads captures this fleeting art form. The Fashion Set: The Art of the Fashion Show presents 10 years of the most memorable, outlandish and groundbreaking set designs in the modern history of fashion.

Fendi SS 2008 show

Fendi Spring/Summer 2008. Photo by Vincent Lappartient, courtesy of Roads Publishing.

In his introduction to the 200-plus-page tome of beautiful photos thoughtfully contextualized, Italian editor Federico Poletti describes the project as an attempt to celebrate the “miniature world that has been carefully planned and constructed, only to suddenly vanish after just twelve spectacular minutes.” The temporality of these performances lends to their special status, as well as the privilege of the audience. Fashion shows are notoriously difficult to access, and this book appeals to our desire for inclusion in the most rarified circles.

Sometimes grand, as in Karl Lagerfeld’s Fendi Spring 2008 show on China’s Great Wall, fashion sets can tap into global historical or artistic influences. Or, as in the case of Henrik Vibskov’s Fall 2015 show titled “The Messy Massage Class,” they may explore, tongue in cheek, smaller social themes like our preoccupation with health services.

Henri Vibskov AW 2015 showHenrik Vibskov Autumn/Winter 2015. Photo by Alastair Philip Wiper, courtesy of Roads Publishing.

FOR SEATS AT THE SHOWS READ MORE

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Paris shone with subtlety this season as established designers experimented with new silhouettes and a fresh crop of creatives—including Koché and Atlein—introduced their vision for the urban sophisticate. Although there weren’t exactly pyrotechnics on the runway, the City of Light shimmered with the obvious skill and vision of the world-class labels who show there.

Here are some of our highlights.

1. Demna Gvsalia’s first Balenciaga collection sent reverberations through the fashion world. Simultaneously showing that nothing and everything was sacred, Gvsalia played with the storied house’s reputation for angular suiting by creating sloped shouldered and hunchbacked silhouettes, disfiguring classic shapes to inject an irreverent sensibility.

Balenciaga Fall 2016
Images: InDigital

THE COUNTDOWN CONTINUES: READ MORE

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To embrace Alessandro Michele’s Gucci is to embrace tidy chaos. And that’s easy to do, even for the most buttoned-down of dressers, in part because of Michele’s ability to make an uncanny mix of texture, print, cut and embellishment combine in a single, perfectly styled look. In short, Gucci’s command of maximalist-cool isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.

Gucci Milan RTW Fall 2016 February 2016Images: InDigital

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Distancing themselves from the digital microprints that were once their bread and butter, Peter Pilotto‘s designers offered a collection of winter wears as practical as they were opulent.Peter_Pilotto_166_fw16Looking to nature and the northern landscape as inspiration for their tactile fall showcase, Peter Pilotto and Christopher de Vos added colors and textures evocative of icy winter scenery. Majestic sweeping hemlines, fluid silks, luxe furs and lace added a soft, Nordic feel with abstract swirling chenille embroidery and delicate knitwear offering substance. Large pinstripe pantsuits were more lackluster, but tiered ruffles on Lurex lace two-pieces joined rippling metallic frocks to close out the show with a bang.

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With decades of industry experience, Vivienne Westwood has created an unapologetic design niche, this season breaking away from fall’s inescapable bohemian trend and opting for edgy London flair.VivienneWestwoodRedLabel_134_fw16Creating a collection for adventurous, intellectual femmes (so basically the Dame herself), the designer delivered an offering of juxtaposing designs wrapped into singular looks. She channeled her quirky spirit into slouchy, wearable power suits, evening dresses over tartan trousers and workwear shirts with covetable blazers that played on proportion and crisp tailoring. Of course, there were staple Westwood pieces like a cardinal red check Prince of Wales coat, floral-lined fedoras, statement prints and haphazardly draped silk dresses that prove to be timeless.

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The Northern Irish designer J.W. Anderson, who’s always making waves in the fashion world, struck magic again Saturday with an out-there fall collection.

jwanderson_081_fw16
Images: InDigital

Only Jonathan Anderson, with his edacity for disjointed narratives and contemporary designs, could take a futuristic riff on the ’60s without seeming redundant. An ode to two-piece party dressing, the collection offered satin track tops tucked into mod skirts with curving, overlapped layers, plus neoprene pencil skirts with stiff, orbiting hemlines reminiscent of Pierre Cardin’s couture days. And despite the understandably awkward (and equally charming) pieces, quilted, rose-emblazoned leather tops and hyper-ruffled skirts held promise for street statement wear.

SHOP: current season J.W.ANDERSON

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