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We’re not sure we believe in the concept of “too much of a good thing”—but the harsh struggle known as too many stellar photos to fit into one online editorial is all too real.

Such was the case with our recent New Streetwear project, shot against the washed-out concrete, gleaming glass and open air of Los Angeles—dozens of stylish, sun-dappled captures (by photographer Zoey Grossman) and only so much available space. We can’t abide good work going to waste around here, so keep reading for our favorite outtakes, along with 10 style tips for spring.

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Above, in fleeting sounds and moving pictures, is a glimpse of what went down last week—when news crews and looky-loos converged on the corner of 6th and Pine outside Nordstrom’s flagship store, the band Helio Sequence blasted sonic ambrosia from inside our window display to the sidewalk beyond, and the founders of Sub Pop Records joined the ranks of local heroes from Jimi Hendrix to Bill Gates on our ‘Seattle Walk of Fame.’

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…And while we’re on the subject:


Here’s a clip we dug up from Sub Pop’s 25th-anniversary music festival last summer—at which we teamed up with Topman and Topshop to street-style passersby. (Watch for cameos from Sub Pop artists King Tuff and Dee Dee from Dum Dum Girls.)


And, just because we want to improve your Monday afternoon—and because we really like Soundgarden, one of the first acts Sub Pop ever signed—here’s a loud yet subtly satirical clip, wherein the dry-humored record label presents dubious commentary on the nature of fame, set to the plodding tempo and soothing distortion of SG’s 1987 B-side “Nothing To Say.”


Speaking of nothing to say (kidding—quite the opposite, actually), be sure to READ OUR FULL Q&A with Sub Pop founders Jonathan Poneman and Bruce Pavitt.
[Photo of Helio Sequence's performance by videographer Patrick Richardson Wright.]

We hold some truths to be self-evident. Among them: There are certain items that every man, from punk rocker to real-estate agent, requires in order to successfully and stylishly face the season at hand. “Essentials,” one might call them. Facing the prospect of springtime, as we currently are, one of those essentials is undoubtedly a well-fitting, impeccably detailed, office-to-evening navy blazer.

Keep reading to see what puts a Ted Baker blazer a cut above many of its contemporaries.

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Bruce Pavitt and Jonathan Poneman—founders of Sub Pop, the Seattle record label responsible for bringing bands like Nirvana and Soundgarden to the masses 25 years ago and still setting sonic trends today—joined the ranks of local legends like Jimi Hendrix, Ken Griffey Jr., Bill Gates and many more yesterday, when Pete Nordstrom led a ceremony inducting them into the ‘Seattle Walk of Fame’ that circles our flagship store at 6th and Pine in the Emerald City.

The brief ceremony, which concluded with the unveiling of Pavitt’s and Poneman’s bronze footprints newly embedded in the sidewalk, was followed by Sub Pop-signed power duo Helio Sequence performing live inside our window. Keep reading for an exclusive Q&A with Sub Pop’s founders, and photos from the event.

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A British expat stationed at the helm of Z Zegna—the younger, more experimental arm of 104-year-old Italian luxury fashion house Ermenegildo Zegna—creative director Paul Surridge seems to approach each season with a mix of minimalistic precision and scientific wonderment. Through it all, he pays homage to the house’s dignified history (and makes rigorous use of Lanificio Zegna, the family’s state-of-the-art fabric mill).

The result on Surridge’s spring 2014 runway was a yin and yang of futuristic yet sophisticated evening wear juxtaposed with a painterly mix of daytime neutrals (as seen in the behind-the-scenes photo above). On our own shelves, Surridge’s vision takes shape in sublimely cut suits in innovative fabrics, poised for a night out, and refined T-shirts and polos that raise the bar on summer weekends, without breaking a sweat.

Keep reading for a Q&A with Z Zegna creative director Paul Surridge himself.

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5 Guys. 5 Trades. 5 Break-in Stories.

Our new collaboration with Nudie Jeans—Swedish master-craftsmen of raw denim in its purest form—follows five men of distinction over the course of nine months, as they do their best to beat up a crisp, new pair of jeans. You can follow their progress here on Men’s Shop Daily, as well as on Instagram.

Keep reading to meet the five guys—from a bicycle shaman to a caffeine connoisseur—whose stories, and jeans, we’ll be getting better acquainted with in the months to come.

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We’re proud to say that one of our favorite surf brands, M.Nii, has been selected as one of GQ magazine’s Best New Menswear Designers in America, 2014.

Being dubbed “The Great Surf Revivalist” in the male fashion tome’s annual Style Bible issue is a lofty title to live up to. But given that the current M.Nii is a resurrection of an Oahu shop that designed custom trunks for JFK back in the day, designer John Moore (left, above) must be used to measuring his work against high standards by now.

Keep reading to see our editor’s picks from the M.Nii collection.

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Whoever coined the phrase “Never look back” clearly hadn’t heard of Grayers, a brand firmly rooted in the fact that inspiration is everywhere—especially in the past.

Keep reading to see the the vintage gems (from a 40-foot boat to a Japanese blanket) that sparked four key items for spring 2014—as selected, shot, and discussed by Grayers creative director Kenny Thomas.

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For Episode One of THE SNEAKER PROJECT: SNEAKERS IN YOUR CITY, we asked Seattle hip-hop legends Thig Nat and Prometheus Brown (aka Geo Quibuyen) to show us the best that their hometown (which happens to be Nordstrom’s hometown, too) has to offer.

Get a ground-level glimpse of the Emerald City in the short video above, and keep reading for a Q&A with Thig and Geo, behind-the-scenes photos, and a closer look at their favorite spots around town (as well as those sneakers they’re sporting).

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“March 26, 1987 marked the release of the Air Max 1 and with it, a revolution began. In the form of a literal window to the sole, the invisible became visible, and Nike Air cushioning forever changed how Nike designed running sneakers.” —Nike Inc.

It’s not every day an aerospace engineer walks into your office with a history-making idea—even when you’re the CEO of Nike. Sparked from an Air-Sole prototype created by engineer Frank Rudy and brought to life through countless trials and errors by shoe designers Mark Parker and Tinker Hatfield, Nike’s iconic Air Max sneaker—the first to ever feature air cushioning you can see—turns 27 today.

Keep reading to see a timeline of vintage Nike ads (with a commemorative ‘Air Max Day’ twist), shop a selection of Air Max Editor’s Picks—and learn how to score a pair of extremely limited-edition sneakers from one of Nike’s elusive ‘Quickstrike’ releases.

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