Behind the Scenes

miansai1Studio images courtesy Miansai; antique fair images and captions by Michael Saiger

Look at the flick of that wrist: Is that a Miansai?

Yes, indeed. The eye-catching Miami-based brand creates masculine, nautical-inspired jewelry. Its calling card is the bracelet. Trademark wrap and cuff models sail out of Miansai’s ocean-adjacent headquarters and end up on fashion runways and wrists of regular guys worldwide.

Versatility is the thing with these bracelets. They look good with t-shirts and with suits. Any occasion is fine. And just so you know, from our official scientific testing at parties, a Miansai bracelet will net at least one compliment per 15 minutes.

We spoke with founder and creative director Michael Saiger about the Miansai name–pronounced my-ahn-sigh–and his main source of inspiration: antique fairs.

Shop: Miansai | jewelry and cufflinks | all accessories

Hit this link for the full Q&A and field report


ervell1Images by David Brandon Geeting

Speaking on the phone with new-to-Nordstrom designer Patrik Ervell about his personal history and design inspirations, we guessed he might talk about coming of age in the 1990s. His take on Seinfeld-esque jeans sort of gives him away as a child of that era.

We didn’t expect the native Northern Californian to go on about Britpop, British underground culture (“they invented all the forms”) and Brutalist architecture. Nor to reveal that he once worked at Nordstrom. But that’s an actual fact.

The clothes you should be wearing this fall from Ervell display a blend of austerity and flyness, with careful attention paid to sensory details. There is a distant Joy Division thing happening, the printed logo on a few shirts looks just like Jodeci’s, and everything is made to feel a certain way on your skin that’s hard to convey through the Internet.

Shop: Patrik Ervell

Read more about Patrik Ervell, including which Brutalist building he admires and visits frequently in New York City’s Chinatown.



While staring at color-changing leaves, we recommend zoning out to this trippy music mix created by Creatures of the Wind–one of the brands we sell in our new SPACE shop. That would be the new venture by our director of creative projects Olivia Kim, to showcase emerging and advanced designers.

SPACE is womenswear-only and we’re feeling it hard for inspiration and gifting.

The mix was used in Creatures of the Wind’s FW 15 runway show last February, where the collection (which we now sell) was inspired by American psychedelic rock.

Our writer Laura Cassidy was on the scene back then and remarked:

“…the soundtrack was appropriately heavy, droney, and fuzzed-out. Imagine Silver Apples’ ‘Seagreen Serenade’ into Captain Beefheart’s ‘Autumn’s Child,’ followed by ‘The Bulblight’ by Rod Freeman and ‘Paix’ by Catherine Ribiero.”

Sounds great except you don’t have to imagine it anymore. Here it is:

And did you know? Laura is back in effect right now at New York Fashion Week, breaking down 2016 collections. Follow along with her right here.

Shop: Creatures of the Wind


asaprocky2  Images courtesy Shomi Patwary

Music video director and friend of the Nordstrom blogs Shomi Patwary previously brought us behind the scenes with Ty Dolla $ign and Mark Ronson. Now he’s giving us rare glimpses at the creative process of the fashion killa himself, A$AP Rocky.

Patwary directed the video for Rocky’s song “Jukebox Joints” with Joe Fox and Kanye West, a highlight off Rocky’s album At.Long.Last.ASAP. West produced the track, which floats on a sample from an old Smokey Robinson jukebox joint.

Patwary’s video is purplish, smoky and the video and language in the song are perhaps NSFW. Know that and consider turning young kids away from the screen as you watch it.

See exclusive photos from the shoot below, and learn which Spike Lee movie inspired the video’s vertically stretched-out look.



jorgevallsdetailsOur own Jorge Valls, Nordstrom Men’s Fashion Director, was featured in a Details article yesterday about “Retiree Style”–a term which writer Alex Frank connects to the rise of unabashedly comfort-focused menswear.

Click here to read the piece.

To be clear: Jorge definitely has a job and is not retired. He’s actually doing his job in this image, headed into a runway show at Paris Fashion Week. When we see him in the halls today we’re going to remind him not to take the “retiree” tag too seriously.

But to keep it 100, jokiness of the term aside, Jorge’s personal style is a perfect example of what the article is talking about: breezy, sporty and perfectly accessorized, a mixture of designer and everyday items worn with an assuredness that comes with killing it over time. Because like Kanye West says: when you try hard, you die hard.

On a related note, click here to listen to Jorge talk about runway shows and overarching trends at the recent New York Fashion Week: Men’s.


richardmacfarlaneipadImages by Andrew Volk

Since we’re opening our third Canadian store on September 18th in Vancouver, B.C., we’ve been renewing our love affair with the city, draping ourselves in wings + horns gear (it’s designed there) and cruising around with 1080p Collection music bumping in our headphones.

That would be the internationally respected dance music label run out of Vancouver by Richard MacFarlane, who releases cassette tapes and floods the Internet with chill vibes. (Sorry we just said “chill vibes” but it had to be done.)

We spoke to MacFarlane about the natural beauty and the music scene in his adopted hometown–he left New Zealand because he felt the country wasn’t cool enough, musically–and which 1080p releases convey the most Vancouverishness.

Check the interview and see images from 1080p headquarters below.

–Andrew Matson



nytimesscan1This just in: Menswear journalist and commentator extraordinaire Tim Blanks has found a new writing home, leaving and joining Business of Fashion.

We read everything Blanks writes and also heartily recommend following him on Instagram, where his bio still says he works at–and where his 15-second reviews of Fashion Week runway shows are crucial.

Read the full story of Blanks’ career transition here via The New York Times.


ycbts1We recently shot imagery out in New York City for Street Report, our upcoming fall streetwear campaign. The finished photos look amazing but we can’t show them to you yet.

However we can show you a glimpse of the future of streetwear at Nordstrom. Our stylists and merchandisers were on set during the Street Report shoot and laced us with behind-the-scenes snapshots.

Stay tuned for Street Report. You’re going to love the collection we put together.

ycbts2Shop: The Rail



chastity-belt-team-shotPhoto by Jesse Codling

It’s been a breakout year for Chastity Belt, the Seattle band which has grown into its voice in the past few years and was recently written up in the New Yorker on the strength of its album Time To Go Home.

Musically, that voice is droning and jangly. Ideologically, Chastity Belt is feminist, with a viewpoint that is often funny but with songs that can also be serious and direct about everyday existential crises.

We took pictures at Capitol Hill Block Party and later phoned guitarist and sometime singer Lydia Lund (far right in the photo) to talk about “Lydia,” a what-does-it-all-mean song which lands someplace…indistinct.

Other topics of conversation included avoiding seasonal affective disorder by gardening, feeling the ocean’s power while surfing–and we learned about the taste of the Peperomia plant.


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In which we look at old Nordstrom logo fonts and give them a close look. These are the fonts of our lives.


If you recognize the typeface above you are either a student of retail or a student of design. Or a Pacific Northwesterner, since this was the Nordstrom logo back in 1930 when we were a Seattle-only shoe store.

Now we’re national and international–with our third Canadian store opening September 18 in Vancouver, B.C. Next year we’ll add Toronto.

Learn about the features and history of this old-school Nordstrom typeface below, with commentary from Strath Shepard, our Creative Director of Designer and Pop-In@Nordstrom–hands-down the biggest font nerd we know.

–Andrew Matson