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Above, in fleeting sounds and moving pictures, is a glimpse of what went down last week—when news crews and looky-loos converged on the corner of 6th and Pine outside Nordstrom’s flagship store, the band Helio Sequence blasted sonic ambrosia from inside our window display to the sidewalk beyond, and the founders of Sub Pop Records joined the ranks of local heroes from Jimi Hendrix to Bill Gates on our ‘Seattle Walk of Fame.’

—  —  —

…And while we’re on the subject:


Here’s a clip we dug up from Sub Pop’s 25th-anniversary music festival last summer—at which we teamed up with Topman and Topshop to street-style passersby. (Watch for cameos from Sub Pop artists King Tuff and Dee Dee from Dum Dum Girls.)


And, just because we want to improve your Monday afternoon—and because we really like Soundgarden, one of the first acts Sub Pop ever signed—here’s a loud yet subtly satirical clip, wherein the dry-humored record label presents dubious commentary on the nature of fame, set to the plodding tempo and soothing distortion of SG’s 1987 B-side “Nothing To Say.”


Speaking of nothing to say (kidding—quite the opposite, actually), be sure to READ OUR FULL Q&A with Sub Pop founders Jonathan Poneman and Bruce Pavitt.
[Photo of Helio Sequence's performance by videographer Patrick Richardson Wright.]

Maestro of American style Ralph Lauren possesses a healthy preoccupation with the art form of aesthetics and engineering known as the automobile. His hobby is well-documented—quite literally, as there’s an entire book on the subject. And, as is the case with most well-rounded individuals possessing a fascination with the world—Lauren’s various pursuits amass to more than the sum of their parts.

Keep reading to hear about the correlation between cars and clothes in Ralph Lauren’s own words, see a few choice photos from the book Speed, Style, and Beauty, and shop our editor’s picks from the immaculate Ralph Lauren Black Label collection.

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Leave it to the cultivated yet comedic design duo behind Shipley & Halmos to combine their menswear expertise, aptitude for product design, and irrepressible sense of humor all under one roof.

We stopped by their limited-run, Canal Street-themed pop-up shop while visiting New York last week. Canal, if you’re unfamiliar, is a mecca of cheap tchotchkes and tacky NYC souvenirs—and while Sam Shipley and Jeff Halmos found inspiration in the low-brow thoroughfare around the corner from SH’s posh design studio, their own iterations of typical Canal trinkets are undeniably sophisticated (and often hilarious).

Keep reading for a look inside the Shipley & Halmos pop-up shop—which you can still visit* through this weekend—and get a healthy dose of the dry wit and attention to detail that informs the brand’s impeccable clothing. We even asked Sam and Jeff a few awkward questions…

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As we near the year 2014, “cyber” is kind of a hilarious word. It tends to conjure visions of Web 1.0—like the bulky hardware and earnest yearnings for virtual reality in this classic, mid-’90s Aerosmith video. (Hey, if it lets you make out with Alicia Silverstone on a moving motorcycle, who’s arguing? Wait—is this where Kanye got the idea for that new video?)

Anyway, while the terminology may be antiquated, the application—Cyber Monday—is nothing to laugh at. Keep reading to see our Editor’s Picks for you, as well as the Silverstone on your list (with December upon us, it’s time to start thinking Christmas gifts, gentlemen).

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TODAY IN AUSTIN, TEXAS: In partnership with Topman and Gorilla vs. Bear, we’re hosting a FREE concert with Small Black in the mall near Nordstrom Barton Creek Square. It happens today, Wednesday, November 6 at 4:00 Austin time—so sneak out of the office, skip class, do what you gotta do.

While you’re there, you can enter for a chance to WIN passes to Austin’s Fun Fun Fun Fest this weekend. Enter for free in the Topman department inside Nordstrom (Austin’s Barton Creek store only). Winners will be announced after the concert.


 

You might remember Gorgui Dieng from a previous post—in which we helped the 6-foot-11 Senegalese center get suited up for the biggest night of his life: the NBA Draft. Now that he’s in the league, he’s busier than ever, both on and off the court—and needs to look the part.

Luckily, Nordstrom Men’s Shop and brands like Hart Schaffner Marx make owning perfect-fitting suits easy—even if you’re not exactly an off-the-rack size. The key is our Made-to-Measure Suits program, which allows you not only to personalize your fit, but also to decide every detail, from rare fabrics and custom linings to adding grippers to the pants that keep your shirt tucked in. Starting at $795, custom suits are within reach for every man—whether you do your best work at a desk or in the paint.

The photos below document our latest fitting with Mr. Dieng—who carved out time to visit our store at Mall of America between rigorous pre-season practices with the Minnesota Timberwolves—as well as a trip to visit Hart Schaffner Marx in Chicago, where they’ve been making suits for over 100 years.







SHOP: HART SCHAFFNER MARX
ALL SUITS | MADE-TO-MEASURE SUITS

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For a deeper look at Gorgui Dieng’s inspiring origins in Senegal, Africa, check out the remarkable photo essay below. Shot by NYC photographer Alessandro Simonetti for innovative sports publication Victory Journal, the imagery documents life at Senegal’s SEED Project, “a non-profit that uses basketball and education as tools to develop responsible and thoughtful leaders committed to the betterment of themselves, their communities and their continent.” Dieng attended SEED (having not picked up a basketball until his teens)—and parlayed lessons learned there into an NCAA Championship, an NBA career, and a chance to encourage new generations of kids in his home country to dream big. Visit www.seedproject.org to learn more and get involved.












 

 
 

[Store and factory photos by Robin Stein. SEED Project photos by Alessandro Simonetti for Victory Journal, via Doubleday & Cartwright.]

Yesterday marked the grand opening of our French Fling Pop-In Shop—a curated selection of eclectic and often exclusive French-themed goods from Rodarte, Kitsuné, A.P.C. and many more. We celebrated here in Seattle by throwing a packed soirée with free PBR, a crêpe truck, and vintage-surf-tinged tunes by amazing pop-punk band La Sera.

At both the in-store shop and the after-party, our friends documented the stylish debauchery via le Instagram. The photos below are our favorites collected from hashtag #NordstromPOP.

[Above: exclusive Saint James Breton-stripe T-shirt.
Photo by @brillapalooza.]


[Photos by @donovanonavan and @nordstromsea.]


[Photos by @artofwore and @espionsecret.]


[Photos by @nordstromchi and @saob79.
Shop: Proenza Schouler backpack.]


[Photos by @stylematrix and @donovanonavan
Shop: Surrealism in Paris book.]


[Photos by @brennaericson and @galendriver.]


[Photos by @carlystarr and @nordstromchi.
Shop: Kenzo sweatshirt.]


[Photos by @brianpaquette and @nordstrom.]


[L: Nordstrom party-people. It was hard to find a shot without lewd gestures.
R: The aftermath—VIP wristband and forgotten free-crêpe token.
Photos by @donovanonavan and @dandrewes.]

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A few more Editor’s Picks from the French Fling Pop-In Shop. (See our previous picks here.)


L-R: A.P.C. hoodie | Cuisse de Grenouille belt | Kitsuné T-shirt | Cuisse de Grenouille knit tie
Cuisse de Grenouille polka-dot flannel shirt

SHOP ALL: FRENCH FLING POP-IN SHOP

—  —  —

Finally, to end your workweek on the right note, a few favorite songs
from our after-party house band La Sera:


Fries. Toast. Kissing. Brigitte Bardot. Champagne. Tiny bulldogs. Plastic Bertrand. Even though the latter (above) rose to international stardom for lip-syncing another guy’s work (the original Milli Vanilli?), the song he made famous is still damn catchy—and one more excuse to raise a glass to all things French.

The above influences and countless more are the raison d’être behind French Fling, our first in a series of Pop-In Shops. Curated by Olivia Kim, Nordstrom’s Director of Creative Projects (and former Creative Director at Opening Ceremony), each Pop-In will feature a collection of goods, including limited-edition and exclusive items, that rally around a specific theme.

This month, said theme is the home of Kenzo sweatshirts, A.P.C. candles—and even a snapback that can parlez-vous français. Next month—who knows? Shop a few of our favorites below, and look for more from our Pop-In Shops coming soon.


Kenzo Paris sweatshirt | A.P.C. candle | New Era cap | Saint James T-shirt | Hedi Slimane book
 

SHOP ALL: FRENCH FLING POP-IN SHOP

Last week, Men’s Shop Daily had the distinct pleasure of catching up with Marcus Wainwright (left) and David Neville, co-founders of Rag & Bone, at their in-store appearance at Nordstrom Bellevue Square, near our Seattle headquarters.

Below, the two British designers—who met in boarding school in England, before starting Rag & Bone more than ten years ago in New York—discuss their fashion baptism in rural Kentucky, smashing guitars, and style advice that every man should swear by.


[Shop: Rag & Bone Men's Sneakers]

MEN’S SHOP DAILY: Welcome to Seattle. Have you been out here before?

DAVID NEVILLE OF RAG & BONE: “We’ve been a few times, but only ever to see the people at Nordstrom. It’s worth the trip. It’s an amazing company.”

MSD: That’s great to hear—what makes you say that?

NEVILLE: “I think that when you look at the history, and the legacy of how it was started, and what it is now…I’ve actually read [Bruce Nordstrom's] book, Leave It Better than You Found It. The fact that it’s still run by the family, and the approach to customer service, and differentiating themselves as a store…The success that’s bred is kind of amazing. It’s 130 stores in America. I should be like a spokesperson.” [Laughs.]


[Shop: Rag & Bone 'St. Regis' Sportcoat]

MSD: You’ve noted the photography of August Sander as an inspiration for your Fall ’13 men’s collection. What drew you to his work, and are there any favorite photographs that stick in your minds?

MARCUS WAINWRIGHT OF RAG & BONE: “I’ve got a lot of his photography. I like photography—I collect [it] and like taking pictures myself. Part of it is just the subject matter—apart from the photographs themselves, the clothes are really cool, and very relevant to Rag & Bone. We do a lot of workwear, we do a lot of tailoring, and the August Sander pictures capture a lot of people working—and he captures them in a period where people were working in suits. If you look at the early pictures of rag-and-bone men, after the Second World War, they’re working day-to-day in tailored clothing. There’s no T-shirts, there’s no just shirt-and-jeans. And there’s a sort of beauty in that handmade clothing that’s been disheveled and rumpled and rained on and worked in.

“So the subject matter of the pictures is amazing. There’s a German aspect to it, which is pretty cool—it’s quite sort of different from the English stuff; it’s less sort of ‘dandy.’ There’s an amazing picture of a baker…and one in particular of a guy in a street in the most beautiful coat, which we made a sort of version of, which closed the show. It’s just great photography.”


[Shop: Rag & Bone Wallets]

MSD: Does Michael Pitt [the actor in Rag & Bone's fall campaign] have the best hair in Hollywood?

NEVILLE: “We were actually a little bit worried about his hair in a couple of the pictures—it just looks a little bit too sort of retro, kind of Johnny Cash, which wasn’t really the reference, you know. But he’s a cool dude.”

WAINWRIGHT: “He does have good hair.”

NEVILLE: “We had fun. He was awesome. He came to the shoot really sort of enthused, and there’s an amazing moment where he smashes his guitar in the middle of 6th Avenue. That was his idea, and it was fairly impromptu—it wasn’t staged or anything. It was cool content to just be able to create.”


[Seattle band Campfire OK played a killer set at our in-store
event—decked out in Rag & Bone, of course.]

MSD: When the two of you first decided to start a clothing company, you visited a legendary denim factory in Kentucky. What was that experience like, and what did you learn there?

WAINWRIGHT: “It was the birth of Rag & Bone in many ways. It was a very old denim factory in Tompkinsville, Kentucky. It had been a massive factory at one point, but everything had shifted—been bought or invested in by a Mexican company, and a lot of denim [production] had moved to Mexico. So it basically shut down most of it, and it was just sort of 60 people, as a sample room for the Mexican production—but it was the best sewers and pant-makers that they had.

“It was an amazing place with 50 years of knowledge about how to make proper jeans. It was an incredible place to go to, when you had no experience in fashion at all, and never really been to a factory to speak of, and you were sort of baptized into the fashion and sewing world by these women who were in their 60s, sewing jeans all day, proper salt-of-the-earth ladies from Kentucky—in a dry county, so there’s no booze. It’s rural Kentucky, and they take great pride in their work, and they’re just lovely people. They taught us the meaning of quality and authenticity and the value of that history of craftsmanship—and the value of that experience, and how easy it is for that to disappear.

“They were the last of 3,000. They shut down within two or three years of us working with them. The ladies who’d been sewing their whole lives went to work in the local outboard motor factory, or Walmart, or waiting tables. Never to sew again. The American-invented and American-owned skill of sewing jeans just disappeared from that factory forever, and it’s happened across this country. And that’s sad. So I think our company has a lot to thank that experience—to thank them—for what they taught us about the importance of maintaining that, and not just shipping everything to a factory that’s chosen based purely on price.”


[Shop: Rag & Bone Ties]

MSD: If you could give male readers one style tip for Fall 2013, what would it be?

NEVILLE: “Don’t try too hard. Do what feels right; what you feel comfortable in. Menswear should never really feel like you’re trying to make a fashion statement. I think that can go desperately wrong. You should just be wearing what you feel comfortable in—and what your wife tells you you should be wearing is maybe a good tip.” [Laughs.]

WAINWRIGHT: “Guys should take pride in their appearance. I think when guys go wrong it’s when they try too hard or they don’t try hard enough. And you get a guy who just doesn’t think about it, and buys a pair of ill-fitting, cheap jeans and a cheap shirt. There’s a lot of inherent beauty in clothes, and clothes can make you feel great, and I think clothes are worth investing in. It’s worth buying the perfect leather jacket, for example, because it’s something that will be with you forever. It may seem like a lot of money, but it’s worth it, and it makes you feel good. And I think it’s important that you take pride in your appearance.”


[Shop: Rag & Bone 'Officer' Boots]

MSD: What’s changed, since you founded Rag & Bone in 2002, in your approach to designing menswear?

WAINWRIGHT: “Not a lot. Menswear doesn’t change much anyway. We’ve been through periods of being more or less adventurous with men’s design, and we learned a lesson as men’s designers, quite quickly, that if you go too far out of the box, guys don’t get it. Girls are way braver—and way more willing to take a risk. You couldn’t get a guy into a white, leopard-print jacket, for example. But that looks cool on you [nodding to our female video producer in the room]. You’ve got to reference things that a guy is familiar with, whether he’s conscious of it, or subconsciously, something he’s seen in a movie, or seen his dad wear, or seen in photographs. That’s what menswear is really about: beautiful fabric, and detail, and making clothes that guys are familiar with—but at the same time, pushing it gently forward in terms of design, and the fashion part of it.”

MSD: After growing up in England, you’ve both lived and worked in New York for more than ten years. What do you appreciate about each place you’ve called home?

NEVILLE: “New York City is an amazing place. The energy of the city is intoxicating, and it’s very different to London in that regard. We thank New York for really giving us the platform to start our company—not just from a practical standpoint, but also from an entrepreneurial sort of enthusiasm, which I don’t think you find in many places in the world. We’ve been in New York a long time, and we feel sort of like adopted New Yorkers now, so that’s great. We miss London, miss our friends, miss the pubs…but I think both of us are very happy where we are, and don’t really have any intention of moving back.”

MSD: Do you visit London often?

NEVILLE: “We have a store in London now, which is exciting—and I think made our parents quite proud.”

—  —  —

In Their Own Words. Here’s a short clip of Rag & Bone founders Marcus Wainwright and David Neville, filmed before their personal appearance at Bellevue Square Nordstrom last week:

 

SHOP ALL: RAG & BONE

 
 

[Photos by Kirby Ellis. Interview by Justin Abbott. Video by Angela Sumner & Sean Dutton.
Special thanks to Marcus, David and the Rag & Bone team.]

During last week’s Nordstrom Men’s Shop x GQ Magazine fall fashion show (benefiting the Detlef Schrempf Foundation for kids in need), we had the distinct pleasure of catching up with Mr. Schrempf himself—as well as a few local celebrities, who were good enough sports to brave the runway themselves in the name of a great cause.

Read their words of wisdom below—and see our exclusive backstage photos here.

DETLEF SCHREMPF—Philanthropist; Retired NBA All-Star.
[Pictured at left, with wife Mari, GQ's Peter St. John, and Nordstrom men's buyer Eric Akines.]

Men’s Shop Daily: How long did you play in the NBA?
Schrempf: “I played 16 years in the league, so that was a good career, but like everything else, life in sports ends sooner or later, so I’ve been fortunate to be in this market, and still have a strong presence with our foundation.”

MSD: What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?
Schrempf: “Clothes make the man? [Laughs.] I’d say knowledge is power. You can never take what’s in your brain, so keep stimulating your brain. Keep studying, keep reading, keep looking at different things.”

MSD: You mentioned you were out of the country recently—what were you doing?
Schrempf: “I was in Nigeria 24 hours ago. I just did a trip for the US State Department, so we did a diplomatic trip doing camps, clinics, visiting schools, orphanages, things like that.”

MSD: Could you say a few words about your organization, the Detlef Schrempf Foundation?
Schrempf: “This is our 20th year, so we’ve been around awhile. We’ve raised over 14 million dollars. Our mission is pretty simple. We want to support children in need, and children’s families in need, in the Northwest. We try to have a large impact on some of the smaller organizations that are very vital to our community, supporting kids and families that otherwise don’t really have that support. We’ve been fortunate to have really strong sponsors and supporters over the years, even after my playing days. Even with Nordstrom, we didn’t start this [yearly fashion show] until I was done playing, and this is our seventh year. So we just have great, loyal supporters, and great partners, and we’re fortunate in that regard.”

 

ISAIAH THOMAS—Sacramento Kings Point Guard; Former UW Husky.

Men’s Shop Daily: Any words for University of Washington fans reading this?
Thomas: “Go Huskies. I bleed purple. I love the Huskies.”

MSD: How was it walking on the runway tonight?
Thomas: “It was great. Definitely out of my comfort zone, but once I started walking, and I got a few cheers here and there, I felt like I was on the basketball court. It’s for a great cause—the Detlef Schrempf Foundation. [Detlef] is a great friend of mine—one of my mentors that stays on me throughout the season. He asked me to do it, and I didn’t even think twice.”

MSD: Any gym tips for guys at home?
Thomas: “The only exercise tips I do, other than playing basketball, is I’ll be on the treadmill and the elliptical. I don’t do too much more. I just try to stay a little fit—because I already eat bad. Fried chicken. Bacon cheeseburger and some fries. I eat fast food all the time! So I gotta stay in the gym.”

 

MYCHAL COHEN—Frontman of Seattle Band Campfire OK.
[Pictured at right, with guitarist Andrew Eckes.]

Men’s Shop Daily: Where did your band name come from?
Cohen: “I was learning how to tattoo. I was making little silly drawings, and one of ‘em was a campfire, and underneath it I just wrote ‘OK’ for some reason, and it was really dumb, and I was like, ‘that’s so funny!’…and then I ended up tattooing it on my leg. The lady who was apprenticing me was like, ‘You should name your band Campfire OK.’ And I was like, ‘Maybe!’ And two years later, I did. I was like, ‘It doesn’t mean anything, it doesn’t make any sense, it sounds kind of ridiculous–let’s do it.’ I mean, band names are ridiculous in general. The Beatles? The Monkees? Pink Floyd? What the hell does that mean?”

MSD: What are you most excited about tonight?
Cohen: “I’m actually really excited to walk on the runway. It’s really cool. None of us have really walked on a runway before. Well, most of the good-looking guys have.” [The celeb guests appeared alongside pro male models.]

MSD: Any thoughts on the cause we’re here to support?
Cohen: “Yes, the Detlef Schrempf Foundation. As they say: They inspire hope for children. They do a lot of good things for children in need, and this is a really cool way to give back. It’s nice to be a part of a cool foundation, with a really cool guy, and his wife is really sweet, too.”

 

STEVEN HAUSCHKA—Seattle Seahawks Kicker.
[...who kicked a game-winner in overtime on Sunday! Nice one, sir. He's pictured at left.]

Men’s Shop Daily: Any words for Seahawks fans at home?
Hauschka: “I mean, they keep bringing it, there’s not much else to tell ‘em. They’ve been so great the past couple years, and that 49ers game was amazing, setting a world record. So the sky’s the limit.”

MSD: What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?
Hauschka: “Trust yourself.”

MSD: Is this your first time walking on a runway?
Hauschka: “No, actually, I did an equine fashion show two years ago—it was a horse fashion show. It was to benefit the Wounded Warrior Project, so it was a great cause. I was wearing some westernwear. It was in a stable, too.”

 

BRIAN CANLIS—Owner, Canlis Restaurant.

Men’s Shop Daily: We heard a few members of our team paid you a visit at your restaurant.
Canlis: “Yes, a whole group of them. There was like, eight or nine. It was so much fun—we went up on the roof and we hung out and took photos, trying not to fall off. Then we went in the wine cellar and drank whiskey in the middle of the day.”

MSD: Was this a work day?
Canlis: “That’s the beauty of the restaurant business—I get to drink and call it work, in the name of the profession! Your co-workers were quote-unquote ‘off work’ that day.”

MSD: What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?
Canlis: “What the heck?! [Thinks for a moment.] If you’re not growing, you’re dying. I think it’s really easy to stop growing, or to get stuck, or to stop taking risks. So I think to always push yourself, and to always lean out, outside your comfort zone. I’m actually going skydiving next week. Someone dared me, and I was like, ‘Yes! I have to do that.’ Because it’s growth, because it’s scary…and I don’t wanna do it. Actually in biology, scientifically, if you’re not growing, you’re dying. You’re either doing one or the other. So I think to always challenge yourself to keep learning is the most exciting thing to wake up to.”

MSD: What’s a kitchen essential every man should have?
Canlis: “A great copper pot. Spend money. Falk is my favorite. You should have a beautiful pot that always lives on your stove, not under, because A) it’s beautiful, B) it’s so beautiful you want to use it, and C) the best type of cooking is the cooking you do long and slow, over the entire day. So if you get a beautiful pot, you’ll want to fill it with delicious things. And when you cook long and slow, it’ll taste better—plus, your place will always smell great.”

 

MSD: What’s a meal you recommend cooking for a date?
Canlis: “Besides breakfast? No I’m just kidding. [Laughs.] Ham and eggs! My favorite is a little bit cheesy, but I like doing homemade pizzas. I like having it be interactive, not me cooking for her—but like, making the dough together, getting a whole bunch of ingredients, and being able to actually get your hands dirty. And you get to make individual, custom, miniature things, which is really fun.”

MSD: What was your favorite part about tonight?
Canlis: “I was shocked by the logistics. I had no idea that for a 20-minute show, there’s a thousand moving parts. I couldn’t believe it. I also didn’t know so many beautiful men could be in so small of a space at one time. And it’s really intimidating. It’s like being in the middle of the movie Zoolander, and not belonging. I kept asking other male models…working on my Le Tigre or my Blue Steel…So when I finally hit the runway, I just had to burst into laughter in total embarrassment. I couldn’t…I smiled like a small child receiving a bowl full of candy because I couldn’t be serious. But it was really fun. I mean, everyone is laughing and taking pictures. You’re supposed to stay serious during that? That’s the hardest work of a male model right there: not breaking a smile. I lasted about three seconds.”

MSD: Canlis restaurant has been in your family for a long time, right?
Canlis: “Sixty-three years. I started for my dad, washing dishes. I was bussing tables. And then he had me go work at other restaurants around Seattle. And then I left home for about 12 years, and I went all over the world, and I never thought I’d come home. But I was drinking whiskey, for breakfast, in Scotland, with my brother Mark, and he convinced me to come back to Seattle and run the company with him. I’m not quite sure how he did that, but I’m glad he did. That was about seven or eight years ago, and it’s been so much fun ever since.”

 

CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM OUR NORDSTROM MEN’S SHOP
x GQ FASHION-SHOW FUNDRAISER.

 
 

[Photos: Schrempf, Thomas and Canlis by Justin Abbott; Campfire OK via @campfireok on Instagram; Hauschka by Kirby Ellis. Interviews by Justin Abbott.]