Surf • Skate • Snow

Saturdays-3108Images by Robin Stein

Surf-inspired brand Saturdays NYC started in 2009 with a staunch imperative to chill, selling espresso shots and hosting hang-outs in the storefront backyard. Years later the brand has become a serious fashion player, but the chill has not waned.

When we met with co-founder Morgan Collett at Saturdays’ showroom in New York, a zen glow hovered over him from the previous day, when he watched the sun rise and surfed in Japan with one of his idols, Kohei Chiba.

A hardcore fan of Swedish design who cut his teeth working for Acne and J. Lindeberg, Collett is also still that kid from Newport Beach, California, who got a varsity letter on his high school surf team.

Read on for our interview with Collett to learn how his brand truly represents a culture, how surfing is different in New York versus Cali–and to see images of prototype shoes in Saturdays’ SoHo showroom.

Shop: Saturdays

Full Q&A through this link


What’s in a name? Sometimes, a lot—at least as far as we can tell when it comes to Arc’teryx-sponsored athlete Roger Strong. We caught up with the professional outdoorsman as he drove down to this year’s Pacific Crest Trail Days hoopla (before jetting off to France for a global Arc’teryx meeting—ah, the good life) to chat about his go-to pistes, favorite Arc’teryx gear and, yes, getting caught in an avalanche.


Image courtesy of Roger

Strong and Joe Stock

In honor of the exclusive his-and-hers Beta LT Jackets that we’re carrying at Pop-In@Nordstrom New Classics, our buds over at Arc’teryx put us in touch with Strong, an avid climber (and skier and fisherman and kiteboarder…) who’s been a sponsored athlete for 15 years and living the vertical life since his childhood in the wilderness goldmine of Denver.

Click this link to fly off a mountain with Roger


We warned you and now it’s here: Street Report, our collection of slammin’ fall styles in the category of streetwear—or athleisure, if you will.

You know, the clothes we wear now: the jogger pants, the bomber jackets, the sneakers, the Timbs. Styling concepts that revolve around layering. Silhouettes that look not like a V (for you sharp suiters out there), but more like you.

Check out our Street Report video lookbook, shot at the Brooklyn Museum in New York City, below.

Shop: Street Report



project-pabloAlbum art for Project Pablo’s I Want to Believe by Devon White

Vancouver is still ruling our lives as we anticipate our new store opening September 18 in that gorgeous Canadian city.

To get properly psyched up, we’ve been bumping beats from 1080p Collection nonstop, 1080p being the label run in Vancouver by one of our heroes Richard MacFarlane–who maintains a frequency of albums and quality of music which makes other labels look lazy in comparison.

We asked MacFarlane which 1080p music would be best for three situations: a party, feeling sad and listening while at work.

For partying, MacFarlane suggested Vancouver’s own Project Pablo–whose hazy house music soundtracks some excellent Tech Decking in the video below for “Movin’ Out”:

Read on for MacFarlane’s commentary. Now please excuse us while we turn up the volume and think Vancouver thoughts about skateboarding, wildlife and islands.

–Andrew Matson



ycbts1We recently shot imagery out in New York City for Street Report, our upcoming fall streetwear campaign. The finished photos look amazing but we can’t show them to you yet.

However we can show you a glimpse of the future of streetwear at Nordstrom. Our stylists and merchandisers were on set during the Street Report shoot and laced us with behind-the-scenes snapshots.

Stay tuned for Street Report. You’re going to love the collection we put together.

ycbts2Shop: The Rail



conversechuckIIRedesigning the Converse Chuck Taylor All Star is a risky proposition. We’re talking about the most classic American sneaker, whose design has gone relatively untouched since 1917. A true shoe of the people.

Think about it. Which other garment is worn by young and old folks alike so prevalently? And in various stages of pristine or tattered? Chucks are like Levi’s 501s for your feet.

And yet: Converse designer Damion Silver was faced with a problem. Foot fatigue was an issue. Especially if you’re trying to wear them every day, All Stars have always been a little hard on your dogs.

Enter Lunarlon, Nike cushioning technology.

That’s just one way Silver–a visual artist who shows his own paintings at galleries all over the world–created the Chuck II, a stellar and more comfortable sequel to Chuck Taylor All Star.

We spoke with Silver on the phone at Converse headquarters in Boston proper about shoveling snow, his unrealistic fantasy of one day skateboarding on a frozen golf course–and the pressures of redesigning the brand’s #1 seller worldwide.

converselunarlonShop: Chuck II high | Chuck II low



coppens1Meet Tim Coppens (last name rhymes with opens), the talented designer who came up through the ranks at Ralph Lauren and adidas and is about to bring his CFDA award-nominated style to Nordstrom. You could call his look athleisure but you’d be better with athluxury.

After all, this is the Belgian designer who recently put 150,000 Swarovski beads on Vans sneakers at New York Fashion Week: Men’s.

Tim Coppens will be shoppable mid-August on our website, and his wares sold in physical form exclusively at our Seattle headquarters and our new Canadian store in Vancouver, B.C.

We caught up with Coppens in his NYC showroom the day after his #NYFWM runway show to get to know him better through his spring/summer 2016 collection, his most personal work to date.

The collection is a memory-dive into his formative years skateboarding around New York City with his European friends in the 1990s, listening to hip-hop, watching Kids and VHS tapes of 411 Video Magazine. That crinkly nylon jacket above comes from Method Man. His red leather pullover is a Patagonia hijack. The magic mushrooms on his varsity jackets come from Tom Penny, the reclusive skater with the psychedelic public image.

Basically, Coppens dream of the ‘90s represents a magic part of his life when he hung with a tribe and followed his instincts, and which changed him forever.



Rhythmedit2Last time our photography/style team Studio N told us what to wear to the beach, they GIF-ed up an animation that inspired us to mix beach gear with our street clothes, and introduced cool brands like Ambsn.

Now they’re at it again. This time their focus is on the Australian/European/American brand Rhythm. It’s a surfing and a lifestyle brand. We’re especially feeling Rhythm’s floral/stone shorts, above. And we’re not mad at all that the name made us re-listen to DJ Quik’s Rhythm-al-ism.

Check the rest of Studio N’s Rhythm-specific editorial images, below.

Photographer: Matthew Sumi
Model: Philip Muscato
Stylist: Grace Erdman & Morgan Dillon
Art director: Eric Bay
Hair & makeup: Tom Pollock

Shop: all swimwear | Rhythm




Shop: Ray-Bans | Gant shirt | chinos | slip-ons

With the Brian Wilson biopic Love & Mercy out now, we thought we’d let you know how to shop the Beach Boys’ look from the late 1960s.

This is how the band dressed early in its life–when all the musicians were still pretending to know how to surf*–before they grew out their hair and started wearing robes. Back then it was stripes, chinos and slip-ons. Classic California style.

The sunglasses are our addition. We swore we remembered Wayfarers as part of this ensemble. Google image search does not agree.

*Only drummer Dennis Wilson ever really surfed.

For more about Love & Mercy, check actor Paul Dano on NPR’s Bullseye below:




This summer, we will recreate this 1980 Nordstrom spring catalog cover. Or versions of it.

We will enjoy long walks on the beach in a romantic mode. We will take off our shoes and socks as much as possible. And we will dress like cotton candy, wearing pink shirts and white pants.

Because this preppy/pastel aesthetic was one thing the ‘80s got right.

Shop: pink shirts | white pants