A$AP Rocky

asaprocky2  Images courtesy Shomi Patwary

Music video director and friend of the Nordstrom blogs Shomi Patwary previously brought us behind the scenes with Ty Dolla $ign and Mark Ronson. Now he’s giving us rare glimpses at the creative process of the fashion killa himself, A$AP Rocky.

Patwary directed the video for Rocky’s song “Jukebox Joints” with Joe Fox and Kanye West, a highlight off Rocky’s album At.Long.Last.ASAP. West produced the track, which floats on a sample from an old Smokey Robinson jukebox joint.

Patwary’s video is purplish, smoky and the video and language in the song are perhaps NSFW. Know that and consider turning young kids away from the screen as you watch it.

See exclusive photos from the shoot below, and learn which Spike Lee movie inspired the video’s vertically stretched-out look.



MARK_RONSON_PICS_0012_Layer 1Mark Ronson and Shomi Patwary on the set

The best party nobody went to might’ve been 12 years ago in Norfolk, Virginia, when producers who would change the sound of hip-hop and R&B deejayed to basically nobody.

We’ll let our music video director friend Shomi Patwary tell you about that one.

Long story short, Patwary and British star Mark Ronson go way back, and we now have the video for “I Can’t Lose.” It’s more zesty funk from Ronson–whom we shall never fail to mention without hyperlinking to his and Aaliyah’s classic Hilfiger ad–and bigger-budget moves from Patwary, best known for A$AP Rocky’s “Multiply.”

Check out behind-the-scenes images below from “I Can’t Lose” and an edited transcript of our phone call with Patwary.

We talked about Michael Jackson’s “Smooth Criminal,” Dick Tracy, Blade Runner, the cameo from Waris Ahluwalia–and what happens when the zeitgeist moves post- ‘90s retromania.


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Swedish-born designer Johan Lindeberg took a bonafide life crisis that would send lesser men into a rock-bottom bender, absorbed its impact, and redirected its power into something positive: He founded BLK DNM, a clothing brand with New York City in its veins and dirt under its nails that, being the culmination of Lindeberg’s years of industry experience, feels like a time-tested authority for best-in-class leather jackets, despite its mere four years on Earth.

Keep reading to hear how he did it, how he bled in a castle, how he’s anti-punk, how jeans are like wine, and why he’s a fan of Hillary Clinton.

(Did we mention he also started taking photos only four years ago, and now spends his spare time photographing women like Gisele Bündchen, Kenza Fourati, Anja Rubik and Arizona Muse? Click through to see our favorites from Lindeberg’s rapidly growing photo oeuvre, too.)

Read More >


Last night, artistic visionaries, musical geniuses, and our favorite concert photographer descended upon New York City’s Highline Ballroom—all for a good cause.

The Other Ball (presented by Topman/Topshop and benefiting Arms Around the Child) honored “quiet revolutionaries changing the world,” like photographer Mark Seliger, and featured performances by a brilliantly eclectic musical lineup—including Swedish songstress Lykke Li, Rihanna collaborator Mikky Ekko, Ohio blues masters The Black Keys, and Harlem’s most fashion-wise rapper A$AP Rocky (pictured above, wearing Topman of course).

With a knack for being in the right place at the right time, photographer Faith Silva was there snapping portraits of performers and guests. Continue reading to see a few more of our favorite photos, and listen to songs by the artists who chose to support a noble charity last night.

Read More >


The Alexander Wang five-step plan for fashion-world domination:
1. Move from San Fran to NYC at age 18 to attend the esteemed Parsons school of design.
2. Drop out.
3. Create a killer debut women’s collection that makes boutique buyers salivate and converts the world’s hippest models, actresses and it-girls into steadfast devotees.
4. Win GQ Designer of the Year 2011, promptly upon your first foray into menswear.
5. Get named creative director of illustrious, 99-year-old fashion house Balenciaga.

That last point is a whole other story, so let’s focus on #4. Wang won over GQ with his T by Alexander Wang line of so-called “basics”—T-shirts, tanks and hoodies that, thanks to their meticulously slouchy “anti-fit” and superior fabrication, are in fact anything but basic.

These days, Wang is punctuating those high-end essentials with streamlined statement items, like the black-on-black cotton/leather shirt-jacket hybrid seen in the photos here. (You could call it a basic in the sense that you’ll wear it every day for years to come. As far as street-cred style points, though—it’s pretty exceptional.)

A few more favorites from the T by Alexander Wang collection (click images to shop each piece):

And, for your viewing pleasure, a sampling of the A-list it-girls and -guys Alexander Wang attracts—featuring A$AP Rocky, Azealia Banks and more:



[Photography: Robin Stein. Styling: Ashley Helvey. Model: Gus Drake.
See more images from this series in our recent Rick Owens post, and on Nordstrom’s Tumblr page.]


Our coverage of New York Fashion Week through the eyes of Travis Gumbs (left) and Joshua Kissi of Street Etiquette continues below. Catch up on previous installments here and here.

From Joshua: “Today’s J. Press York Street collection was a great presentation, adding to what it means to commemorate traditional American prep attire while still pushing the envelope. The prep style happens to be one of our main influences, so it’s great to see it presented in such an array of looks. Public School, on the other hand, took care of the street-casual department, with a lot of dark colors and leather to inspire your cool next fall and winter.”

Inspired by Travis’ Look:
Leather Jackets | Beanies | Scarves | Ties | Oxfords

Inspired by Joshua’s Look:
Trenches & Overcoats | Zip-Up Sweaters | Camo Pants | Sneakers | Bags

J. Press York Street (designed by Ariel and Shimon Ovadia of Ovadia & Sons)—coming soon to the Nordstrom Men’s Shop.
[Click smaller images to enlarge.]

Trekking between shows. If we’re not mistaken, that’s Nico of Nickel Cobalt in the navy poncho.

NY Knick Carmelo Anthony (left), self-promoting at the Public School presentation.

Hood By Air, where rapper A$AP Rocky closed the show. [Click small images to enlarge.]

Scenes from outside Milk Studios and around NYC. [Click smaller images above to enlarge.]


[Photos by Street Etiquette and Joshua Woods.]