Designer Collections

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Photos by Atsushi Nishijima and Yoshiyuki Matsumura, courtesy Arc’teryx

You likely know Arc’teryx–the outdoors brand based in Vancouver, B.C., which has a fanatical following and specializes in the kind of technical perfection required by Olympics-level skiers.

But do you know Arc’teryx Veilance?

The fashion-oriented Veilance line balances body movement with a minimalist aesthetic, comprising anatomically tailored pieces which are perfect for, say, riding your bike to work. And then wearing while at work.

There’s a considered subtlety to the design of the Veilance line which reveals itself in real life. The hidden buttons on the blazers. The geometry of the sweater yoke. The soft proprietary weaves of wool, nylon, cotton and elastane.

Get a feel for Veilance in these images from the Arc’teryx publication Tomorrow, which uses as a model the famous photographer JIMA.

Shop: Arc’teryx Veilance

Click here to see Veilance unveiled

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Jeffrey-Kalinsky

In case you missed it, W Magazine caught up with Nordstrom fashion director Jeffrey Kalinsky and got the goods on his favorite spots in his hometown of Atlanta.

If you’re ever in that neck of the U.S., our recommendation is to follow his recommendations. Jeffrey’s expertise extends far beyond the garment.

Read: Jeffrey Kalinsky’s Atlanta

Shop: men’s designer

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Introducing Acne Studios for Men

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We’re psyched to announce Acne Studios for men is now available at Nordstrom–Acne being the Swedish designer brand known for modern, conceptual minimalism.

Most items are purchasable now. Others are available for pre-order. A second wave of styles is coming this January.

Take a look at the clothes below and read commentary from our men’s designer buyer Dan Drewes, who explains a little more about the brand and what it was like at the Acne showroom in Paris.

Shop: Acne Studios

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Marcus-Wainwright-and-David-Neville1Marcus Wainwright and David Neville at the Vancouver Nordstrom 

Occupying a supremely trustable space in the designer category, rag & bone makes clothes you don’t have to think hard about. They look and feel great, every time.

Recently, rag & bone honchos Marcus Wainwright and David Neville launched Standard Issue, a line they hope you’ll consider even less carefully.

It’s not that they don’t want to engage intellectually. It’s that they want to provide an automatic option for men who seek an unflashy wardrobe foundation–and who appreciate the kind of perfection that comes from British tailoring, where the label and logo aren’t important, but a certain cleanness radiates when you’re wearing the garments.

In our view: mission accomplished.

Read on for Wainwright and Neville’s explanation of Standard Issue–they’re inspired by Japan and the military–and to see images of their office spaces.

Shop: rag & bone Standard Issue | rag & bone Standard Issue denim | all rag & bone

This way for the Q&A

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You think you can mess with Karl on any level?

karl3Think again, cowboy.

Man, myth and fashion maestro Karl Lagerfeld is the subject of an article by Andrew O’Hagan which you must read.

Through the piece, we gain a greater appreciation for Lagerfeld’s intellect and specific flavor of inscrutability–a kind of sparkling aloofness which might be annoying if he didn’t hit nothing but homeruns as the designer of Chanel, Fendi and his own line, to name a few projects.

But homeruns he hits. And so he is legend. Have you ever worn a Lagerfeld watch or gifted anything Chanel or Fendi for a special occasion? Then you already know.

Read the piece 

Shop: KARL LAGERFELD | Chanel | Fendi

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ervell1Images by David Brandon Geeting

Speaking on the phone with new-to-Nordstrom designer Patrik Ervell about his personal history and design inspirations, we guessed he might talk about coming of age in the 1990s. His take on Seinfeld-esque jeans sort of gives him away as a child of that era.

We didn’t expect the native Northern Californian to go on about Britpop, British underground culture (“they invented all the forms”) and Brutalist architecture. Nor to reveal that he once worked at Nordstrom. But that’s an actual fact.

The clothes you should be wearing this fall from Ervell display a blend of austerity and flyness, with careful attention paid to sensory details. There is a distant Joy Division thing happening, the printed logo on a few shirts looks just like Jodeci’s, and everything is made to feel a certain way on your skin that’s hard to convey through the Internet.

Shop: Patrik Ervell

Read more about Patrik Ervell, including which Brutalist building he admires and visits frequently in New York City’s Chinatown.

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umitbenanPeep this fire ensemble from Umit Benan, one of the newer designer brands acquired by our expert buying team. We’re feeling everything about Umit Benan’s Fall/Winter 15 Fisherman Collection–and this outfit specifically, from the cut of the pants and shape of the jacket, to that attention-grabbing banded collar shirt. Flawless victory, Mr. Benan.

Here’s Benan in an article our friends at Four Pins hipped us to, talking about the inspiration for the Fisherman Collection, influenced by growing up in Turkey and absorbing life in Bosporus Strait port cities:

“When you go down to the Bosporus, you see men, 50-60 years old, with big bellies and facial hair, wearing extremely colorful clothes. Yes, most of them are technical garments from brands like Nike or adidas, but I like this contrast between these masculine Turkish men and all these bright colors. […] It was just a childhood memory I wanted to share.”

Hit the link below to see our full Umit Benan offerings.

Shop: Umit Benan

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daoyichowwhitebackground1Did you know Dao-Yi Chow, who co-runs the CFDA-winning brand Public School with Maxwell Osborne, is a writer and onetime rap journalist? It’s true. He confirmed it when we asked him recently at the inaugural New York Fashion Week: Men’s.

Chow used to contribute to The Flavor back in the day, a “real hip-hop magazine” based in Seattle in the mid-1990s. Chow went by Durwin Chow GNS, “graffiti non-stop,” and lived in New York. Most Flavor writers back then contributed their stories by fax machine.

Here’s Chow’s July 1994 cover story, an interview with the brain-twisting duo Organized Konfusion.

Fun fact: Organized Konfusion’s Pharoahe Monch would one day ghostwrite for Diddy, who would eventually employ Chow and Osborne as designers at his clothing brand Sean John–before Public School became one of the hottest brands in menswear.

–Andrew Matson

Shop: Public School | men’s designer collections

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chapter2New York Fashion Week: Men’s began with a set of presentations by brands at Industria Superstudios in the Meatpacking District, one of which sounded like it was happening underwater.

Chapter, the Los Angeles-based label with an otherworldly and somewhat grim aesthetic, brought free-form industrial bass to the building courtesy The Floor, a duo consisting of Minimal Wave Records boss Veronica Vasicka and a man known only as Regis.

It was a good soundtrack for designer Devin Carlson’s spring/summer 2016 collection, which channeled dark vibes through conceptual clothing you could actually see yourself wearing.

We caught up with Carlson in the hallway during the presentation and talked about his inspiration for “Displacement” (the name of the collection), his impressions of #NYFWM and his early fashion experiments at Alta Loma High School.

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Swedish-born designer Johan Lindeberg took a bonafide life crisis that would send lesser men into a rock-bottom bender, absorbed its impact, and redirected its power into something positive: He founded BLK DNM, a clothing brand with New York City in its veins and dirt under its nails that, being the culmination of Lindeberg’s years of industry experience, feels like a time-tested authority for best-in-class leather jackets, despite its mere four years on Earth.

Keep reading to hear how he did it, how he bled in a castle, how he’s anti-punk, how jeans are like wine, and why he’s a fan of Hillary Clinton.

(Did we mention he also started taking photos only four years ago, and now spends his spare time photographing women like Gisele Bündchen, Kenza Fourati, Anja Rubik and Arizona Muse? Click through to see our favorites from Lindeberg’s rapidly growing photo oeuvre, too.)

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