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Monochromatic

We recently paid a visit to Studio N, our off-site photo studio inconspicuously located in Seattle’s industrial Georgetown neighborhood. We came back with some monochromatic documentation—perhaps a subconscious sign of how much we’re digging clothes with a classic, can’t-go-wrong lack of color lately.

Keep reading to see a few more behind-the-scenes snaps—plus our Editor’s Picks in high-contrast, low-difficulty black and white.

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British designer Neil Barrett, whose grandfather and great-grandfather were master tailors, knows a thing or two about clean lines and confident silhouettes. His latest collection, though manifested in his signature mod-art minimalism, was inspired by the Bahá’í Faith. It’s a bit difficult to get a pulse on precisely what that means, but one interpretation might lie in the 19th-century Persian religion’s core value of unity—that all races, religions and genders are created equal. From luxed-up sweatshirts to immaculate topcoats made more casual by cropping at the waist, every look on Barrett’s runway feels somehow equivalent; on a level playing field of laid-back formality. Check out other unifying themes that caught our eye below:


Get Mono. Black-on-black, camel-on-camel, navy-on-navy. Going monochromatic is subtle and forceful at the same time.


Textural Feelings. From leather panels to fuzzy wool to embossed chevron patterns, Barrett found countless ways to add interest to his restrained palette. (Click images to enlarge.)


Oddball Geometry. Quintessential shapes like crewnecks, bombers and blazers were treated as blank canvases for op-art graphics.

Neil Barrett is available at selected Nordstrom stores.
For assistance, please contact a Designer Specialist at 1-877-543-7463.

Check out the full Fall/Winter 2013 slideshow at GQ.com.

 

[Photos courtesy of GQ's Instagram and GQ.com.]