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Just because the Spurs cut the Finals a bit short last month, trouncing the Heat 4-1, doesn’t mean you have to spend the rest of summer without a basketball fix.

Stance—maker of unique socks for the office, the basketball court, and lounging (and sliding) in style at your hardwood-furnished apartment à la Risky Business—has outdone itself yet again. Now, in addition to carrying out said activities in stripes, spots, floral, Fair Islecamo, tie-dye, leopard and 4th of July-appropriate red, white and blue, you can also don the photographic likenesses of your favorite NBA legends—on your feet.

Keep reading to see six of our favorite socks (and players), from The Reign Man to The Worm—plus classic highlight reels for each one.

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You might remember Gorgui Dieng from a previous post—in which we helped the 6-foot-11 Senegalese center get suited up for the biggest night of his life: the NBA Draft. Now that he’s in the league, he’s busier than ever, both on and off the court—and needs to look the part.

Luckily, Nordstrom Men’s Shop and brands like Hart Schaffner Marx make owning perfect-fitting suits easy—even if you’re not exactly an off-the-rack size. The key is our Made-to-Measure Suits program, which allows you not only to personalize your fit, but also to decide every detail, from rare fabrics and custom linings to adding grippers to the pants that keep your shirt tucked in. Starting at $795, custom suits are within reach for every man—whether you do your best work at a desk or in the paint.

The photos below document our latest fitting with Mr. Dieng—who carved out time to visit our store at Mall of America between rigorous pre-season practices with the Minnesota Timberwolves—as well as a trip to visit Hart Schaffner Marx in Chicago, where they’ve been making suits for over 100 years.







SHOP: HART SCHAFFNER MARX
ALL SUITS | MADE-TO-MEASURE SUITS

—  —  —

For a deeper look at Gorgui Dieng’s inspiring origins in Senegal, Africa, check out the remarkable photo essay below. Shot by NYC photographer Alessandro Simonetti for innovative sports publication Victory Journal, the imagery documents life at Senegal’s SEED Project, “a non-profit that uses basketball and education as tools to develop responsible and thoughtful leaders committed to the betterment of themselves, their communities and their continent.” Dieng attended SEED (having not picked up a basketball until his teens)—and parlayed lessons learned there into an NCAA Championship, an NBA career, and a chance to encourage new generations of kids in his home country to dream big. Visit www.seedproject.org to learn more and get involved.












 

 
 

[Store and factory photos by Robin Stein. SEED Project photos by Alessandro Simonetti for Victory Journal, via Doubleday & Cartwright.]

Welcome to part two of Austin City Limits as seen through the analog lens of acclaimed music blog Gorilla vs. Bear—presented by Topman and Nordstrom Men’s Shop.

Catch up on GvsB’s Polaroids from part one here; and see their Instagram coverage of Austin City Limits 2013 at @NordstromMen.

[Pictured above: HAIM]


Killer camo. More ACL street style on our Instagram: @NordstromMen.


San Antonio Spur/sandwich enthusiast Matt Bonner | Festival veteran


Dj Sober


ACL pirate | The big screen


Gorilla vs. Bear photographer Faith Silva



Autre Ne Veut


The crowd at Grimes

 

Hand-selected by Gorilla vs. Bear—
a few favorite songs by bands mentioned above:


 

 
 

[Photos by Gorilla vs. Bear and Faith Silva—using film from The Impossible Project.]

HUGE CONGRATULATIONS to Mr. Gorgui Dieng, who entered the NBA as the 21st pick in the 2013 draft last night.

Our Nordstrom Men’s Shop team was there with him the whole way—from early-morning fitting sessions at Joseph Abboud HQ in NYC, to styling out Gorgui’s perfect Draft-night look inside his hotel room mere hours before the event, to cheering him on from the stands at Barclays Center in Brooklyn last night.

Things we saw: Diehard NY Knicks fan Spike Lee repping orange and blue in the front row, rowdy fans booing NBA commissioner David Stern every time he stepped on-stage to announce the next team’s pick (and Stern egging them on to boo louder), and scores of dapperly dressed draftees—of whom we are hands-down confident Gorgui was the most well-appointed.

Admittedly, we might be biased—but just look at that subtle windowpane-plaid suit, crisp white shirt, smart mix of patterns between his tie and pocket square, perfect pant break…we could go on, but just see for yourself.

Perhaps most impressive is the fact that our friends at Joseph Abboud turned Gorgui’s two suits (one for draft night, one for the next-day media frenzy) around in just two days—an impressive feat, especially considering the star center’s 6-foot-11 frame. Better still, the suits were crafted right here in the USA, in Abboud’s factory in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Score a made-to-measure suit of your own at any Nordstrom store.

Amidst all the excitement, we also had the great opportunity to sit down with Gorgui to discuss his humble beginnings in Senegal, his admirable work ethic, and his experiences as a Louisville Cardinal—which of course led to an NCAA National Championship last season. Watch our exclusive video up top, and read on for the full Q&A.

MEN’S SHOP DAILY: Where did you grow up?
GORGUI DIENG: “I’m from Kébémer, Senegal. It’s in West Africa. A little town, about 22,000 people.”

MSD: What kinds of values did your parents instill in you?
GORGUI: “Oh, I think I’m very blessed to have the family that I have. They are great and they support me in whatever, and I think my dad and my mom spent a lot of time to raise me and make me the person I am today. I am very happy that they did that for me, because I left them six years ago, fairly young, and in this big country—if I wasn’t educated to have morals, if they didn’t instill cultural things in me, I probably would be lost. I probably would be today on the street, or in jail, or doing some crazy stuff. So I feel very lucky to have the parents I have.”

MSD: What were some challenges you faced in Senegal?
GORGUI: “It was fun growing up there, but when it comes to economy and school and stuff, it’s tough. Things that I wanted to do, I could not do back home because there was no stuff to go to school and play basketball or go to school and play a different sport, so I was home, but I didn’t have much help. We didn’t have a lot of infrastructure up there and it was just very tough. School is nothing compared to here. When I came to this country, I had everything I needed. People take care of me, I have tutors and studied on computers, and everything is completely different.”

MSD: How did you first start playing basketball?
GORGUI: “Honestly, when I first saw people playing basketball I thought it was just a good sport. I thought, ‘It’s not hard, you just catch the ball and put it in the basket.’ You know? [Laughs]. And then a lot of my friends that I used to play soccer with—the soccer field and the basketball court were close, so my friends, they started quitting playing soccer, and playing basketball instead until there were just a few guys left. So I just joined all my friends and started playing basketball.”

MSD: How did you continue from there with your basketball playing?
GORGUI: “I just got taller, and someone saw me and said, ‘Do you want to go to school and play basketball for free?’ I said ‘Yeah.’ They said, ‘I will take you to the United States.’ And I said ‘I would love to do that.’ And I went to SEEDS [Sports for Education and Economic Development in Senegal] Academy for one year, and I went to Basketball Without Borders in South Africa, that’s an NBA camp, and after that, they brought me here. I went to one year of prep school at Huntington Prep in West Virginia, then I went to Louisville for three years. So I’ve played like six years overall, of organized basketball.”

MSD: What do you love about playing basketball?
GORGUI: “It’s very fun and I always enjoy it. I love playing basketball more than anything. I like just playing basketball and making friends.”

MSD: What was it like when you first moved to the US?
GORGUI: “When I first got here, it was very tough. I could not speak English. Like, when you say ‘Hello’ to me, I just stare at you, you know? [Laughs]. I wouldn’t know what you were saying. It was very hard, and I knew I had to go to prep school and make a great score for my SAT to go to college—and I wanted to go to a big school. So I just would spend all of my time studying. And sometimes, I would just stay in my room and get very frustrated and start crying. I was just young, and I couldn’t see my family, and I couldn’t talk to anybody. I wasn’t scared, but I was just frustrated. And I fought through all of that, and I went to college, and today I’m talking about getting my degree—and I think that’s pretty exciting.”

MSD: What was it like the first time you met Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino?
GORGUI: “The first time I met him, we could not talk, because I could not speak English. [Laughs]. I just shook his hand, and he was talking to my coach and stuff, I didn’t get it. Everybody was laughing. Two months later, he came to see me, after I started to speak English a little bit, and that’s when he started recruiting me.”

MSD: What lessons have you learned from Coach Pitino over the years?
GORGUI: “Coach always said, ‘There’s a lot of people that go in the gym and work, but there are few people that go in the gym and work hard.’ He said, ‘I just want you to be one of those.’ And since then, I get it—and he pushed me hard, and kept pushing me, and always asked the best from me. And that’s what I’ve been doing. On the court, when I’m the one that just got yelled at and pushed hard, or something happened on the team and I’m the one to blame—he just wanted to prepare me, you know. And I can’t thank him enough for that.”

MSD: There’s a famous video clip where you’re on the bench, it looks like Coach Pitino shouts in your face, and after he walks away you kind of laugh—do you remember what he said to you?
GORGUI: “Yeah I remember that. But I don’t think I can repeat it! [Laughs]. You know, I don’t take Coach too serious because I know how he is. When he’s on the court he just wants to go all out—he doesn’t care what he does to win the game, he will do it. He has so much passion for the game. But, the player needs to understand that, too. So, even when he says some stuff, you know, I just laugh, because I think that’s the best way I can handle it.”

MSD: Who was your roommate on the road with Louisville, what’s his nickname…and did he have any strange habits?
GORGUI: “When we’re on the road I room with Russ Smith. You know him—he’s crazy. ‘Russdiculous.’  He’s my guy. He’s like someone I will really miss in college, and I miss him already. He is always fun to be around. Like when you’re on the road, he doesn’t sleep. He would take my iPad and my laptop, and his phone in his hand, and would have Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram sitting on the desk until 4:00 in the morning. I would go to sleep and wake up and be like, ‘Russ, what are you doing? We have a game tomorrow!’ He’d say, ‘No, I’m good.’ He just doesn’t sleep. He has a lot of energy—especially in the way he plays.”

MSD: What are some lessons you learned from Louisville’s championship season last year, that you think might help prepare you for the NBA?
GORGUI: “Just to never quit, no matter what happens. We won like 14 games in the beginning of the season, then lost three in a row, and we never hung our heads. We played a game that started at 9pm and went until 1am—five overtimes—never quit. It’s just mental toughness. I think guys need that in the NBA—if you’re not tough in the NBA, you won’t survive. And I think I will be ready for that.”

MSD: How important is it to look good and feel confident on a night as important as the NBA Draft?
GORGUI: “It’s very important. It’s all about showing people who you are. If I just go there with shorts and a T-shirt, people will never forget that. If I go there and look very nice, people won’t forget that either. It’s all about your legacy. That’s how I take everything I do—whether it’s playing basketball or not, I want to carry myself as a professional and do everything in the right way.”

The Nordstrom Men’s Shop is thrilled to have the opportunity to assist Gorgui Dieng—star center of NCAA national basketball champs the Louisville Cardinals—as he preps for the biggest night of his life: The NBA Draft.

With pro basketball players stepping up their style game across the league, this is no time to go half-hearted in the sartorial department. That’s why we teamed up with famed American suit-makers Joseph Abboud to create two impeccable, made-to-measure suits for Gorgui (who happens to be 6-foot-11)—in a span of only 48 hours.

Our Men’s Shop team met with Gorgui Tuesday morning at the Joseph Abboud showroom in New York, to select fabric swatches, see him through the fitting process, and ensure he has all the tools he needs to pull it together—from ties (he prefers slim) to custom shirts to size 16 shoes.

We’ll also be there for him this afternoon, when the finished suits (one for Draft Night, one for the whirlwind press tour the following day) arrive at Gorgui’s hotel room, to help him suit up for his big night with the utmost confidence that he’s never looked better.

CHECK BACK TOMORROW for an in-depth Q&A with Gorgui,
to see his custom suits in all their splendor, and to find out which NBA team
will be lucky enough to have him on the roster next season.

It’s a busy week for the Seattle-based Nordstrom Men’s Shop team, as we find ourselves out in NYC amidst oppressive humidity and curious aromas to which we’re not accustomed. Of course, we’re having a blast nonetheless.

Follow us on Instagram—user name @NordstromMen—to catch daily updates as we spend the next several days crisscrossing New York City and catching up with some of our favorite menswear designers. First up was a visit to the rad Tribeca loft/office/showroom that serves as a second home to Sam Shipley and Jeff Halmos of Shipley & Halmos.

Sam sketched his power animal for us (to anatomically correct precision—check the dorsal), while we did our best to ignore onlookers in their dapperly wallpapered water closet. And these are just the outtakes. For additional photos from our Shipley & Halmos visit—plus more to come as we continue to drop in on our favorite designers this week—follow @NordstromMen on Instagram.

 

Well, all the underdogs we’d been pulling for (Grizzlies! Warriors! Pacers!) have officially fallen, and the perhaps-inevitable grudge match between the high-flying, reigning-champ Miami Heat and the San Antonio Spurs’ methodical phalanx of wily veterans is set to tip off tonight.

We have a general idea of whom Rihanna (above) will be rooting for. What about you?

For our part, after the cringe-worthy tantrum 2013 MVP LeBron James exhibited below—upon being called for an offensive foul during Miami’s failed comeback against Indiana in that series’ recent Game 6—we’re not sure we can feel good about having his back at the moment. (Pat Riley’s face at 0:15 says it all.)

Whichever bandwagon you’re ready to jump on, we have the appropriate gear to show your team spirit:


Strideline ‘Texas’ Socks | Banner 47 ‘Miami Heat’ T-shirt

 

Tune in to ABC tonight at 6:00pm Pacific
to see how Game 1 shakes out.

 
 

[Photo via Rihanna's official Instagram; video © TNT and the NBA. Individuals pictured do not endorse Nordstrom.]

Preposterous comebacks. Dodging head-butts. Staring down Spike Lee. Those are just a few of the reasons hall-of-famer Reggie Miller earned the nickname “Knick Killer” during the knock-down, drag-out, no-holds-barred NBA Playoff grudge matches known as Knicks vs. Pacers throughout the 1990s. The clip above explains in more detail.

A trash-talker of epic proportions, Miller backed up his foul mouth, somewhat ironically, with a subtle but deadly-accurate shooting touch that was akin to poetry in motion. These days, his menswear game is just as legendary.

Check out Miller’s on-screen style highlights from last year’s postseason below—and tune in tonight at 8:30 Eastern to watch this year’s young and hungry Indiana Pacers (whose elimination of the star-powered NY Knicks last week must have made Miller smile) take on defending champs the Miami Heat in game 1 of the Eastern-Conference Finals.


Miller’s bold but tasteful color combos (and slim, perfectly tied four-in-hand tie knots)
put him in a league of his own amongst sportscasters.


Dark suit, pale-blue shirt, striped tie. When you nail the details, you can keep it simple
and still be the best-dressed guy in the room (even when the room seats 20,000).


When your dress shirt fits perfectly, you look just as sharp sans jacket.
(A smart pattern mix of stripes and dots doesn’t hurt, either.)


Instant visual proof: A khaki-colored suit helps you stand out from the crowd come summer.


Bold stripes bring a sport-inspired element to your suit.


In a sea of blue suits, the one with confident, shoulder-enhancing peak lapels is the clear winner.


You would almost think that Miller and Marv Albert planned this ahead of time—but Reggie’s subtler
suit stripes, sharper fit and nonchalantly puffed pocket square give him the advantage.

 

SHOP: SUITS | DRESS SHIRTS | TIES

And, if you’ve got an NBA-sized physique, shop Big & Tall.

 
 

[Video clip from 'Winning Time: Reggie Miller Vs. The New York Knicks,' directed by Dan Klores, part of ESPN Films' 30 For 30 series. TV captures via the NBA and TNT. Individuals pictured do not endorse Nordstrom.]

What happens when you lock buyers, stylists, tailors, models, video crew, and a rack full of dress shirts in a room for three days straight? For one thing, they churn out 30+ dress-shirt fit videos (more on those later). Secondly, they lose their minds a little. We showed you Cara Delevingne and fellow bored British models do the ‘Harlem Shake’ a few weeks ago—now it’s our dress-shirt video team’s turn.

Watch for detailed fit videos on more than 30 of our most popular dress shirts coming soon—they’ll show up on the product detail pages, along with all the other vital stats you need to know before pulling the trigger. We’ll also debut a video outlining our three dress-shirt fit categories (regular, trim, extra-trim), featuring tips from Jaime Fernandez (above), shirt and tie buyer for Nordstrom.com. From the look of that spread-collar and top-notch four-in-hand knot, dude knows his stuff.

SHOP: DRESS SHIRTS | TIES & POCKET SQUARES

 

In other important ‘Harlem Shake’ news, none other than LeBron James and the Miami Heat put their own spin on the internet fad recently. With the best record in the league, we’d say they earned the right to drop their game faces and have fun for 56 seconds.

Did you realize the NBA Playoffs start this weekend? Time flies. The Heat start the road to defending their title on Sunday—but tune in to ABC and ESPN all day Saturday, 4/20, for killer Round 1 match-ups like Celtics v. Knicks, Warriors v. Nuggets, Bulls v. Brooklyn (is Derek Rose back yet?) and Grizzlies v. Clippers in a rematch of last year’s brutally physical 7-game series. And clear your schedule for the next month or so, while you’re at it.

All we want for Christmas is…pretty much everything in our Men’s Contemporary Clothing department right now. We haven’t been THAT nice this year though, so we’re happy to settle for five back-to-back basketball games—on regular TV! (NBA League Pass was another gift we didn’t quite hit the niceness quotient for)—on Christmas Day. If you have kids, make sure to wake them up bright and early so you can get all that present-opening jazz out of the way before the 9am tip-off. The lineup is as follows:

Boston Celtics at Brooklyn Nets — 9am PST (ESPN)
The Nets have youth on their side (and an enthusiastic new crowd, after relocating to Brooklyn this season with the help of part-owner Jay-Z)—but the Celtics have experience. Tensions will be high after the brawl that broke out during the Nets’ road victory last month.

New York Knicks at LA Lakers — 12 noon PST (ABC)
NY has been rolling (even with goggled behemoth Amar’e Stoudemire on the bench), while LA has had a tough time coalescing (a serious test of Kobe’s zen) due to new personnel. Their saving grace may be the return of legendary point guard Steve Nash (with a sharp new haircut, too boot).

Oklahoma City Thunder at Miami Heat — 2:30pm PST (ABC)
A rematch of last season’s Finals—and potential preview of this year’s, as each team narrowly leads its respective Conference in the standings. Should be close…as long as Lebron and Durant don’t start comparing notes on whose movie was cooler.

Houston Rockets at Chicago Bulls — 5pm PST (ESPN)
Last year’s Finals-favorite Bulls are faring admirably, despite still being sans MVP Derrick Rose—but are only a game ahead of Houston, who are surprising everyone thanks to acquiring phenom Jeremy Lin and former Sixth Man of the Year (and bearded wonder) James Harden.

Denver Nuggets at LA Clippers — 7:30pm PST (ESPN)
Griffin and Chris Paul are insane—but watch for agile big man DeAndre Jordan and off-the-bench killer Jamal Crawford to have highlights, too. Still, the defense-minded Nuggets (now with gold-medalist Andre Iguodala and block monster JaVale McGee) won’t make it easy.

{SHOP NBA SPORTS FAN GEAR}

 

To bring things back into a menswear realm, if we may, here’s the king of NBA-announcer swagger: hall-of-famer Reggie Miller. That dark, wintery plaid on broad, bold, peak lapels? The guy’s suiting game is as confident as his outside shot. Meanwhile, his finishing touches—a merlot repp tie (cinched in a nice, tight, four-in-hand knot—no ham-fisted double windsors for this pro) and green polka-dot pocket square—are an elegant nod to the holidays.

SHOP PLAID SUITS: REGULAR | BIG & TALL
SHOP PLAID SPORTCOATS: REGULAR | BIG & TALL

Pacific NW Shout-Out: The Miller pics above and below are from a game last week in our Seattle sister-city of Portland, Oregon, where the underdog Trail Blazers beat San Antonio on national TV. The icing on the cake? Craig Sager brought the broadcasting team a pink box full of locally legendary Voodoo Doughnuts at halftime:

Check out our past posts on the NBA’s best- and worst-dressed announcers—and coming soon, look for a retrospective on Reggie Miller’s style highlights from last season.

[Commercial courtesy of the National Basketball Association; images courtesy of the NBA on TNT. Individuals pictured do not endorse Nordstrom.]