Main Content

sneakers

Whereas our first installment of “Sneakers in Your City” followed two hip-hop artists to their favorite spots in Seattle, episode 2 takes us to New York, where Ryan Plett—the photographer, consultant, and self-described “generalist” behind popular mood board blog You Have Broken the Internet—showed us the Big Apple through his own unique lens.

He also shot some damn fine looking photographs for us. Keep reading to watch a behind-the-scenes video, hear about five places to seek out in NYC, and get a closer look at fall footwear from The Sneaker Project, a curated selection handpicked by our buyers.

Read More >


Wives, kids, domestic partners: Curious what gifts and activities your Man of the Moment might enjoy this Father’s Day? (It’s June 15, by the way.) In order to discern the complex goings-on that occur behind a dad’s stoic visage, we went straight to the source, asking several real-life family men here at Nordstrom HQ to offer notes on their personal style and parenting style.

Keep reading for a few last-minute dad-isms from Justin Abbott, Senior Editor of Men’s Shop Daily and Pop-In @ Nordstrom—who couldn’t resist, after seeing how much fun fellow fathers Jeremy, Bob, Yaro and Justin M. had with their recent Dad’s Day posts.

Read More >

 

Wives, kids, domestic partners: Curious what gifts and activities your Man of the Moment might enjoy this Father’s Day? (It’s June 15, by the way.) In order to discern the complex goings-on that occur behind a dad’s stoic visage, we went straight to the source, asking several real-life family men here at Nordstrom HQ to offer notes on their personal style and parenting style.

Keep reading for our second installment in this series, in which Yaro Levkiv—a brand-new dad who’s still adjusting to #burblife, as he sometimes refers to it—shares his thoughts on “dad jeans,” Russian cartoons, and the ideal Father’s Day breakfast.

Read More >

For Episode One of THE SNEAKER PROJECT: SNEAKERS IN YOUR CITY, we asked Seattle hip-hop legends Thig Nat and Prometheus Brown (aka Geo Quibuyen) to show us the best that their hometown (which happens to be Nordstrom’s hometown, too) has to offer.

Get a ground-level glimpse of the Emerald City in the short video above, and keep reading for a Q&A with Thig and Geo, behind-the-scenes photos, and a closer look at their favorite spots around town (as well as those sneakers they’re sporting).

Read More >

“March 26, 1987 marked the release of the Air Max 1 and with it, a revolution began. In the form of a literal window to the sole, the invisible became visible, and Nike Air cushioning forever changed how Nike designed running sneakers.” —Nike Inc.

It’s not every day an aerospace engineer walks into your office with a history-making idea—even when you’re the CEO of Nike. Sparked from an Air-Sole prototype created by engineer Frank Rudy and brought to life through countless trials and errors by shoe designers Mark Parker and Tinker Hatfield, Nike’s iconic Air Max sneaker—the first to ever feature air cushioning you can see—turns 27 today.

Keep reading to see a timeline of vintage Nike ads (with a commemorative ‘Air Max Day’ twist), shop a selection of Air Max Editor’s Picks—and learn how to score a pair of extremely limited-edition sneakers from one of Nike’s elusive ‘Quickstrike’ releases.

Read More >


 

On the heels of last season’s curated selection of American-made boots, our men’s shoe team has decided to one-up themselves with a tightly edited showcase of rare sneakers from legendary as well as up-and-coming brands. We’re calling it The Sneaker Project—and from retro runners to luxe leather trainers, we’re confident it offers shoes to knock the socks off even the most discriminating fan of the game.

Keep reading for a closer look at six of our favorite brands—plus a chance to see them in action.

Read More >

As the mastermind behind every Pop-In @ Nordstrom—technically speaking, Olivia Kim hand-selected every item in our new, limited-time menswear shop: Heartbreakers Club. But because some might be daunted by the sheer volume of rare streetwear and historic menswear gems therein, we asked her to condense things down to a handful of cream-of-the-crop favorites.

Keep reading for a starter-set of exclusive and limited-edition menswear, from Heartbreakers Club curator Olivia Kim.

Read More >


 

With Christmas right around the corner, we asked three male colleagues here at Nordstrom HQ to share what’s on their gift radar this year. Last up is Danny Mankin, our Lead Men’s Stylist—a man whose sneaker collection we envy almost as much as his interior-design skills. If this sounds like someone on your own holiday shopping list, continue reading to find the perfect gift.

Read More >

These French flag-themed New Balance 574s were made in the USA especially for our French Fling Pop-In Shop in extremely limited numbers—and there’s a decent chance we still have them in your size! But not for long. As the wise man who writes our product pages stated, they’re “more rare than an Henri Jayer Pinot Noir, and pair a heck of a lot better with shorts.”

Grab your tri-colors while you can, whether you care to show your allegiance to liberté, égalité and fraternité—or just want to out-class the world’s foremost street-style stars. (Sneakers this chic go with everything from turned-up dad jeans to tailored suits these days, don’t you know.)

SHOP ALL:
FRENCH FLING POP-IN SHOP 
MEN’S SNEAKERS 

Last week, Men’s Shop Daily had the distinct pleasure of catching up with Marcus Wainwright (left) and David Neville, co-founders of Rag & Bone, at their in-store appearance at Nordstrom Bellevue Square, near our Seattle headquarters.

Below, the two British designers—who met in boarding school in England, before starting Rag & Bone more than ten years ago in New York—discuss their fashion baptism in rural Kentucky, smashing guitars, and style advice that every man should swear by.


[Shop: Rag & Bone Men's Sneakers]

MEN’S SHOP DAILY: Welcome to Seattle. Have you been out here before?

DAVID NEVILLE OF RAG & BONE: “We’ve been a few times, but only ever to see the people at Nordstrom. It’s worth the trip. It’s an amazing company.”

MSD: That’s great to hear—what makes you say that?

NEVILLE: “I think that when you look at the history, and the legacy of how it was started, and what it is now…I’ve actually read [Bruce Nordstrom's] book, Leave It Better than You Found It. The fact that it’s still run by the family, and the approach to customer service, and differentiating themselves as a store…The success that’s bred is kind of amazing. It’s 130 stores in America. I should be like a spokesperson.” [Laughs.]


[Shop: Rag & Bone 'St. Regis' Sportcoat]

MSD: You’ve noted the photography of August Sander as an inspiration for your Fall ’13 men’s collection. What drew you to his work, and are there any favorite photographs that stick in your minds?

MARCUS WAINWRIGHT OF RAG & BONE: “I’ve got a lot of his photography. I like photography—I collect [it] and like taking pictures myself. Part of it is just the subject matter—apart from the photographs themselves, the clothes are really cool, and very relevant to Rag & Bone. We do a lot of workwear, we do a lot of tailoring, and the August Sander pictures capture a lot of people working—and he captures them in a period where people were working in suits. If you look at the early pictures of rag-and-bone men, after the Second World War, they’re working day-to-day in tailored clothing. There’s no T-shirts, there’s no just shirt-and-jeans. And there’s a sort of beauty in that handmade clothing that’s been disheveled and rumpled and rained on and worked in.

“So the subject matter of the pictures is amazing. There’s a German aspect to it, which is pretty cool—it’s quite sort of different from the English stuff; it’s less sort of ‘dandy.’ There’s an amazing picture of a baker…and one in particular of a guy in a street in the most beautiful coat, which we made a sort of version of, which closed the show. It’s just great photography.”


[Shop: Rag & Bone Wallets]

MSD: Does Michael Pitt [the actor in Rag & Bone's fall campaign] have the best hair in Hollywood?

NEVILLE: “We were actually a little bit worried about his hair in a couple of the pictures—it just looks a little bit too sort of retro, kind of Johnny Cash, which wasn’t really the reference, you know. But he’s a cool dude.”

WAINWRIGHT: “He does have good hair.”

NEVILLE: “We had fun. He was awesome. He came to the shoot really sort of enthused, and there’s an amazing moment where he smashes his guitar in the middle of 6th Avenue. That was his idea, and it was fairly impromptu—it wasn’t staged or anything. It was cool content to just be able to create.”


[Seattle band Campfire OK played a killer set at our in-store
event—decked out in Rag & Bone, of course.]

MSD: When the two of you first decided to start a clothing company, you visited a legendary denim factory in Kentucky. What was that experience like, and what did you learn there?

WAINWRIGHT: “It was the birth of Rag & Bone in many ways. It was a very old denim factory in Tompkinsville, Kentucky. It had been a massive factory at one point, but everything had shifted—been bought or invested in by a Mexican company, and a lot of denim [production] had moved to Mexico. So it basically shut down most of it, and it was just sort of 60 people, as a sample room for the Mexican production—but it was the best sewers and pant-makers that they had.

“It was an amazing place with 50 years of knowledge about how to make proper jeans. It was an incredible place to go to, when you had no experience in fashion at all, and never really been to a factory to speak of, and you were sort of baptized into the fashion and sewing world by these women who were in their 60s, sewing jeans all day, proper salt-of-the-earth ladies from Kentucky—in a dry county, so there’s no booze. It’s rural Kentucky, and they take great pride in their work, and they’re just lovely people. They taught us the meaning of quality and authenticity and the value of that history of craftsmanship—and the value of that experience, and how easy it is for that to disappear.

“They were the last of 3,000. They shut down within two or three years of us working with them. The ladies who’d been sewing their whole lives went to work in the local outboard motor factory, or Walmart, or waiting tables. Never to sew again. The American-invented and American-owned skill of sewing jeans just disappeared from that factory forever, and it’s happened across this country. And that’s sad. So I think our company has a lot to thank that experience—to thank them—for what they taught us about the importance of maintaining that, and not just shipping everything to a factory that’s chosen based purely on price.”


[Shop: Rag & Bone Ties]

MSD: If you could give male readers one style tip for Fall 2013, what would it be?

NEVILLE: “Don’t try too hard. Do what feels right; what you feel comfortable in. Menswear should never really feel like you’re trying to make a fashion statement. I think that can go desperately wrong. You should just be wearing what you feel comfortable in—and what your wife tells you you should be wearing is maybe a good tip.” [Laughs.]

WAINWRIGHT: “Guys should take pride in their appearance. I think when guys go wrong it’s when they try too hard or they don’t try hard enough. And you get a guy who just doesn’t think about it, and buys a pair of ill-fitting, cheap jeans and a cheap shirt. There’s a lot of inherent beauty in clothes, and clothes can make you feel great, and I think clothes are worth investing in. It’s worth buying the perfect leather jacket, for example, because it’s something that will be with you forever. It may seem like a lot of money, but it’s worth it, and it makes you feel good. And I think it’s important that you take pride in your appearance.”


[Shop: Rag & Bone 'Officer' Boots]

MSD: What’s changed, since you founded Rag & Bone in 2002, in your approach to designing menswear?

WAINWRIGHT: “Not a lot. Menswear doesn’t change much anyway. We’ve been through periods of being more or less adventurous with men’s design, and we learned a lesson as men’s designers, quite quickly, that if you go too far out of the box, guys don’t get it. Girls are way braver—and way more willing to take a risk. You couldn’t get a guy into a white, leopard-print jacket, for example. But that looks cool on you [nodding to our female video producer in the room]. You’ve got to reference things that a guy is familiar with, whether he’s conscious of it, or subconsciously, something he’s seen in a movie, or seen his dad wear, or seen in photographs. That’s what menswear is really about: beautiful fabric, and detail, and making clothes that guys are familiar with—but at the same time, pushing it gently forward in terms of design, and the fashion part of it.”

MSD: After growing up in England, you’ve both lived and worked in New York for more than ten years. What do you appreciate about each place you’ve called home?

NEVILLE: “New York City is an amazing place. The energy of the city is intoxicating, and it’s very different to London in that regard. We thank New York for really giving us the platform to start our company—not just from a practical standpoint, but also from an entrepreneurial sort of enthusiasm, which I don’t think you find in many places in the world. We’ve been in New York a long time, and we feel sort of like adopted New Yorkers now, so that’s great. We miss London, miss our friends, miss the pubs…but I think both of us are very happy where we are, and don’t really have any intention of moving back.”

MSD: Do you visit London often?

NEVILLE: “We have a store in London now, which is exciting—and I think made our parents quite proud.”

—  —  —

In Their Own Words. Here’s a short clip of Rag & Bone founders Marcus Wainwright and David Neville, filmed before their personal appearance at Bellevue Square Nordstrom last week:

 

SHOP ALL: RAG & BONE

 
 

[Photos by Kirby Ellis. Interview by Justin Abbott. Video by Angela Sumner & Sean Dutton.
Special thanks to Marcus, David and the Rag & Bone team.]