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Street Etiquette

If you’re out and about pre-dawn on this fine, post-Thanksgiving morning, we salute you. However, the best, surefire way to avoid epic confrontations over the last leather jacket (or dastardly cloak?) in your size at the store is to simply stay home—pie in-hand, football on-screen, enjoying our Online Black-Friday Deals from the comfort of your couch.

To celebrate Black Friday, we picked a few of our favorite sale items—in timeless, stylish, black. Keep reading to see our sale-priced Editor’s Picks.

Read More >

For our latest collaboration with renowned men’s life and style blog Street Etiquette, we partnered with Topman to send SE founders Joshua Kissi and Travis Gumbs from New York City to England to explore the British brand’s roots. Now presenting our third installment of Travel Etiquette: London.

CONTINUE TO FULL PHOTO GALLERY >

For our latest collaboration with renowned men’s life and style blog Street Etiquette, we partnered with Topman to send SE founders Joshua Kissi and Travis Gumbs from NYC to England to explore the British brand’s roots. Presenting our second installment of Travel Etiquette: London.

CONTINUE TO FULL PHOTO GALLERY >

For our latest collaboration with renowned men’s life and style blog Street Etiquette, we partnered with Topman to send SE founders Joshua Kissi and Travis Gumbs from NYC to England to explore the British brand’s roots. Presenting Travel Etiquette: London.

CONTINUE TO FULL PHOTO GALLERY >

Presenting the sights of New York Fashion Week as seen through the eyes of Joshua Kissi and Travis Gumbs of Street Etiquette. Learn more about them here and here.

From Joshua: “Great shows today, from experimental menswear by Luar Zepol, with Matrix-inspired gear and the usage of panel-lined shirts and pants, to Billy Reid, where models stomped onto the runway to the beat of a soulful, live brass band in a Southern-styled courtyard. Very enjoyable!”


Inspired by Joshua’s Look:
Jean Jackets | T-ShirtsJeans | Bags | Bracelets | SneakersDenim on Denim


Joshua’s soundtrack for the day. More of Street Etiquette’s thoughts on music here.






Inspired by Joshua’s Look: Leather Jackets | Camo | Black Jeans | Loafers [as seen here]
Pictured above: The runway show for global design project Concept Korea.





Inspired by Travis’s Look: Coats & Jackets | Polo Shirts
Selvedge Denim | Boots | Hats | Bags
Pictured above: Excitable crowd at the Rag & Bone show. See it up close on The Thread.

Below, Josh and Travis attended the Alabama-meets-NYC rooftop party known as Billy Reid Spring ’14. Read our recent Q&A with Billy, and shop his Fall ’13 collection here: Billy Reid.



FOR MORE STREET ETIQUETTE:
- Part I of this series
- Last season’s NYFW coverage
- Exclusive SE Video + Q&A

 

[Photos by Street Etiquette.]

Here’s a recap of the latest from our NYC correspondents Street Etiquette, via their Fashion-Week Instagram journal exclusively for @NordstromMen. Stay tuned for more visuals from their recent New York Fashion Week endeavors in the days to come.

[Above: Street Etiquette's Joshua Kissi wears a camo shirt by Hugo Boss,
black coated jeans, and loafers by Sperry Top-Sider.]


L: Leather weather with @NateBui.
R: Raw denim sighting at the G-Star Raw presentation.


L: Stylish reads—perusing the official photo book outside Street Etiquette’s Slumflower exhibit.
R: Taking in the shows. Pictured: global design project Concept Korea.


L: Street-style tones with artist and Street Etiquette collaborator Cleon Grey.
R: Jazz and prep at NYC’s Lincoln Center.


Taking a break from the hectic Fashion Week schedule to enjoy the NYC city view.

 

FOR MORE STREET ETIQUETTE:
Read our Q&A
See their official Spring ’14 NYFW photos, pt. 1

Amidst world travels, presenting their own clothing line at the recent menswear tradeshows, and debuting an art installation based on their first short film, the multitalented men behind acclaimed website Street Etiquette (Travis Gumbs, above, and Joshua Kissi, below) still found time to document the visual spectacle known as New York Fashion Week in collaboration with Nordstrom Men’s Shop.

Here, enjoy part 1 of NYFW as seen through the eyes of two preeminent authorities on the future of men’s style—including a look at what’s next from one of our favorite American designers, Todd Snyder.

[For more, catch up on last season's SE @ NYFW coverage.]


Inspired by Joshua’s look: T-shirts | Cargo Pants | Sneakers | Bracelets

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WnBMZcqzbqk
Joshua’s recommendation for the day’s playlist.
Read more on Street Etiquette’s musical predilections here.




Travis of Street Etiquette (left) and stylist Keino Benjamin.

Inspired by Travis’s look: Jackets | Jeans | Short-Sleeve Shirts | Hats | Boots
(Travis’s boots are by Dr. Martens—shop similar here.)

Inspired by Keino’s look: Leather Jackets | Sunglasses | Black Jeans


Indie NYC brand L’Enchanteur.


Inspired by Joshua’s look: Distressed Jeans | Henleys | Tote Bags | Boots
Inspired by Travis’s look: Denim on Denim | Shorts | Sneakers


Joshua of Street Etiquette and photographer Justin Bridges of Tucked Style.



From left: artist Cleon Grey, Jerry St. Aubin, photographer Joshua Woods
(who contributed to our previous SE @ NYFW series).


Chucks—the classics endure.

Below, Josh and Travis had the chance to get up-close and personal with Todd Snyder’s Spring 2014 collection. Read our recent Q&A with Todd, and shop his Fall collection here: Todd Snyder. [Click small images to enlarge.]


 

FOR MORE STREET ETIQUETTE:
Last season’s NYFW coverage
Exclusive SE Video + Q&A

 

[Photos by Street Etiquette.]

As hinted at in our recent Q&A, our good friends Joshua Kissi and Travis Gumbs of Street Etiquette are back to cover the stylish mayhem known as New York Fashion Week once again.

Seen here are initial installments from our own @NordstromMen Instagram feed, where you can continue to see NYFW through the Street Etiquette gents’ eyes in the days to come. Stay tuned to Men’s Shop Daily for more from our Street Etiquette x Nordstrom collaboration coming soon.


L: The epic beard and immaculate street style of @EliSoul01.
R: A first glimpse at the spring/summer 2014 offering from Todd Snyder.


L: Fashion-week wingtips on the feet of @ReallySL.
R: Shadowy style courtesy of @DapperLou.

 
L: Cameras and camo, two fashion-week essentials.
R: Note to self: Think black, white and beige for next spring. [At the @PublicSchoolNYC presentation.]


L: Huge congrats on our Street Etiquette friends’ first gallery showing: Slumflower.
R: Killer madras and a classic cap, sported by @LavishLivez.

Style Profiles. In honor of our twice-a-year Men’s Shop Catalog dropping this month, we decided to profile 6 real men of style and substance. Today, the men behind acclaimed style, life, and travel website Street Etiquette.

Joshua Kissi and Travis Gumbs are a lot of things: stylists, models, photographers, expert thrift-shoppers, music lovers, cultural ambassadors, historical preservationists—and proof of the power of the internet.

High-school friends from the Bronx, the two started a blog—called Street Etiquette—to document their growing interest in refined personal style. Their early work followed a successful blueprint: Build a dapper outfit based on a classic menswear item, and explore said item’s significance by delving into historical photos. Think ’60s biker gangs giving context to leather jackets, and Pat Boone rocking suede bucks. The next thing they knew, Kissi and Gumbs were gracing the pages of GQ and The New York Times at the ripe old age of 22.

Two years later, they’re designing their own clothes, producing short films, and generally proving that the universe is kind to those with passion, curiosity, and a willingness to work hard. We caught up with the guys in NYC this summer—to take some photos, shoot a video, and better understand their continual quest to learn and be inspired. Read the full Q&A below.


[On Joshua, left: John Varvatos blazer | Ted Baker shirt
Dockers cargos | Cole Haan wingtips
On Travis: Wallin & Bros. quilted vest & chambray shirt
Jack Spade chinos | Nike running shoes]

MEN’S SHOP DAILY: What does the phrase “Street Etiquette” mean to you guys?
JOSHUA KISSI OF STREET ETIQUETTE: For us, it’s more than a website. It’s more than the clothing. It’s like a lifestyle that we’ve built, just on inspirations around us. It’s not all about Travis and myself—it’s bigger than that. It’s what we’re inspired by, whether it’s traveling, clothing—just everything that encompasses life for us, is classified as Street Etiquette. So it’s more than a website. The site is like the platform where we put ideas that we have and what we’re inspired by. It’s just the portfolio.

What was Black Ivy?
TRAVIS GUMBS OF STREET ETIQUETTE: Black Ivy was a photo editorial that we did about three years ago. We got a whole bunch of our friends [together]. We were paying homage to the old HBCs, and Ivy style. We shot it at 145th and City College. The response was a lot bigger than we ever anticipated.

What is an HBC?
Travis: Historically black colleges. We found a whole bunch of old photos, like from Howard, and these guys were super dressed-up, and the style was amazing. And we were like, “We can do this.” At the time, it was a style that we were [already] venturing into. So we were like, “You know what, why don’t we just come together and just shoot this, and see how it comes out.” And it just worked.


[The Blacky Ivy, by Street Etiquette.]

What are some of the things guys were wearing in the historical photos you mentioned?
Travis: Definitely like the typical prep stuff, like tweed jackets, shorts, loafers with socks, ties—
Joshua: …Suspenders, oxfords, paperboy hats…
Travis: …And just wearing it your own way. So we had guys that were super prepped-up, and then we had guys that were a little bit more lax—a little bit more like the bad-boy style, but it was still the same Ivy, prep style. The same clothes, but it’s about how you wear it. That’s what was really cool about it—we would see these photos, and see all these different types of guys, but they were all dressed up in their own way. So we really wanted to show that with Black Ivy, and I think we were able to do it.

You said it got a larger response than you anticipated?
Joshua: It was just one of those things where people kept talking about it.
Travis: I think it challenged a lot of social issues, in a sense, like masculinity, black masculinity, perception of style and who you are—so it touched on a lot of social topics that people didn’t necessarily want to talk about until they saw the editorial, and it was like, “OK, let’s talk about this stuff.”

Tell us about some of your recent travels.
Travis: We did this cool project in Angola this past summer. And that was great, because it was my first time in Africa. Josh, he’s been to Africa before. But we really got to soak up the culture and photograph stuff we never got to photograph before. And then, in a couple weeks, we’re actually going to Thailand to do the same thing.

 
 
[Excerpts from Street Etiquette's Travel Etiquette series.]

What do you enjoy about traveling?
Joshua: I think traveling is one of the best educations you can get. Exposing yourself out there kind of reveals who you are as a person, how people see you, as you cross each continent and each country. It’s super interesting, waking up and just walking around the street. It’s definitely fun. We have this thing called Travel Etiquette—it’s basically our series of traveling around the world with style and character, through the lens of Travis and myself.

To decide the destination of your recent trip to southeast Asia, you guys conducted an online poll amongst your readers.
Joshua: The poll was interesting. There were a lot of votes from Vietnam, and Thailand, and Hong Kong. People were really repping for their cities.
Travis: A lot of people were voting from those places. It’s crazy, because you can see the votes; you can see where they’re coming from. A lot of people voted from Asia—I feel like more than the United States.

What kinds of things are you looking forward to seeing?
Joshua: Just the fashion—see what the fashion is like there, even if it’s just regular, everyday people. I’m not saying like runways—just how people live and do their style every day. That’s important.

You’ve mentioned in the past, Joshua, that the streets are like the new runways. Could you elaborate on that?
Joshua: What I meant when I said that, is that style and fashion are not just encapsulated for one week in February or one week in September—it happens every day. And it’s not just downtown. It’s not just uptown. It’s not just Brooklyn. It’s all over the place. [Getting] inspiration from people on the street…is one of the biggest things for us. Especially right now—everybody has a camera. There’s an overload of information for people to go out there and explore.

It’s interesting to delve into your guys’ Tumblr page and see the wide range of art, culture, and history that you reference. What do you think inspires you the most, in life and in your work?
Joshua: My inspiration comes from a plethora of eras, like 1950s, ’60s…1980s hip-hop, punk rock—
Travis: Reggae.
Joshua: …Reggae, exactly. Reggae culture. Skinhead, mod—the U.K. had a big influence on us, too. [But] to be honest, I think a lot of our inspiration comes out of jazz.

What are some of your favorite jazz musicians?
Joshua: Coltrane, Miles Davis, Mingus, Max Roach was an amazing drummer. Thelonius Monk. There are a lot of good guys. Chet Baker.

Favorite albums?
Travis: Well, of course Bitches Brew [1970, by Miles Davis], because that’s a little bit different from anything else. I mean it’s a little bit redundant at this point—to say Miles Davis is kind of like saying Michael Jackson. It’s true, though, you know? It’s not overrated; it’s justified.


[Behind the scenes at Street Etiquette's Sewn From The Soul
project, which honored Black History Month.]

Do you prefer late-era Miles, then?
Travis: I like it all, because for the era that he was in, he was pushing the boundaries. So each era was good for what he was doing. It wasn’t just like, Miles Davis of the ’80s, more experimental than Miles Davis of the ’60s—that wasn’t really the case. [In each era], he was perfecting a certain sound and a certain taste level that he wanted to do. And he did it. He was able to switch his sound for every decade that he did music. It’s very few artists that did the same.
Joshua: The funny thing is, I have no vinyls. It’s all off the Internet. Kind of Blue is great. Even though in his later times, people consider that he got a little bit too weird—in the way he dressed, or his music—I think that as an artist, it’s kind of like your obligation.

When did you guys first get into jazz?
Travis: I didn’t listen to jazz growing up at all. [In] my household…we listened to more soul stuff, reggae, hip-hop in later years—but it wasn’t until maybe a few years ago that I started getting into jazz. Honestly, it was more the style thing, because we were doing research on different styles. And then you see the style, and you get into the music, and you see why the style was so refined for the music. When you start listening to it and developing that taste, it’s phenomenal. It’s one of those things. I listen to jazz at least two, three times a week.

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Joshua: [Jazz music] calms you. It’s not as, like, rambunctious and lyrics-driven as [most of] today’s music—but there’s still a message.
Travis: There’s a lot more emotion.
Joshua: You feel that message according to your ears and what you want to hear. And that’s one of the most important things. But for me, I play the drums—so growing up with jazz is kind of essential, just for that beat.

So it sounds like together, the two of you really delved into jazz based on how the musicians dressed.
Joshua: We love the way that the jazz musicians dressed. They kind of represented the first type of “cool” in America, you know? A lot of kids—I mean, the original term “hipster” meant going away and trying to be a jazz musician on the road, and traveling, and just, like, doing your hitchhiking thing. So it’s like they were the original cool.
Travis: And then, when you go back and listen to it, you see how many hip-hop artists sampled from jazz musicians. So it was interesting to see that. Hip-hop is a form of jazz; it evolved from jazz.
Joshua: It’s all related, really.


[Promotional posters for Street Etiquette's new short film, Slumflower.]

Tell us about the project you’re debuting [this Saturday, 9/7] during New York Fashion Week this season.
Travis: It’s called Slumflower, and it’s a photo editorial and a short film. It was, like, 17 of our friends all suited up in tailored suits. We shot it in the projects.
Joshua: …In public housing, which isn’t far from here [Ed. note: we were filming at Milk Studios in NYC]. It’s like 16th and 9th or something like that. The short film just came from an idea we had and wanted to present. [It's about] a kid living in the projects, dressing a certain way, and he’s kind of defying social inequalities. There’s a message behind it, but it’s represented through style.

You guys have made videos of your travels and whatnot before, but this is your first official “film.” How did production go?
Joshua: We did the whole routine, as far as storyboarding, location-scouting, budgets. It’s going good. We’re just trying to define the meaning of having a blog—or a website, or a brand, whatever the case may be.

That raises a good question: What do you say your job title is, when you meet someone?
Joshua: Funny thing about job titles, especially living in New York—it’s like a constant conversation starter. “Hey, what do you do?”
Travis: The number-one question…If I’m not really feeling like [explaining], I’m like, “You know what? I’m a blogger.”
Joshua: It’s bigger than that, though.
Travis: The term “blog” seems too amateur for some reason. I mean, we’ve been “blogging” for five years now. But it’s like, what’s the next level of—
Joshua: …Yeah, that’s the next question. Everybody is like, “What’s next? What’s after ‘blogging’?”
Travis: Are you a “professional blogger”?
Joshua: [In the end], you just want to keep pushing out good work. [These days], everybody is kind of a Jack-of-all-trades—a Renaissance man. So somebody asks you…but there’s no job title. And that’s the best thing about it: you kind of get to diversify, rather than just be in a box.
Travis: Yeah, the title thing is weird. If I could just not have a title, that would be cool. Then, I could just do whatever I want. I could do stuff outside of what my title would be.


[The video Street Etiquette shot while covering New York Fashion
Week for the Nordstrom Men's Shop last season.]

How did you two first meet?
Joshua: We met in Iceland. No, I’m playing. We met at high school in the Bronx. Straight up.
Travis: There’s no cool story behind it, though.
Joshua: It was like, biology class.
Travis: We were both into style at the time. That’s how we connected. We would both post on online forums, like Hypebeast and Superfuture, and got a lot of followers on there. That’s how we got a lot of traction when we started Street Etiquette [in college].

So did you guys have different tastes than most of your classmates in high school?
Joshua: Yeah, definitely. We saw a bigger picture in a sense, than our high-school peers. You get ridiculed for dressing different, because high school is all about fitting in.
Travis: We were just curious to know what else was out there, outside of our borough. So, we started coming downtown—because no one came downtown, man. [When you live] in the Bronx and whatnot, you don’t come to the city at all. You stay up there. You come to the city once in a while, you do a little shopping, and you head back up. We would actually come down here and—
Joshua: Hang out.
Travis: That’s how we connected with a lot of our friends from Brooklyn, and Harlem and whatnot. We were amongst all these other—a lot of these guys were actually older than us, too, so they knew a lot more. And they kind of helped us craft our taste level.

What do you guys love about New York City, and how does living here inspire you?
Joshua: New York City is the best city in the world, as far as I know. Just the energy. It’s a melting pot. You can see every type of ethnic group, every culture. You’re exposed to so much here. Growing up in the Bronx…you got the Spanish cats, Jamaicans, West Indians, Africans—all in one. All those cultures are vastly different, and you have friends from each one.
Travis: You know, like, sometimes you go to your friend’s house and you’re eating Spanish food—or you eat Jamaican, or Indian, or whatever—so it molds you as a person, to always be open.
Joshua: There are very few places in the world that you can do that, from what I’ve seen. It’s such a big melting pot; that’s what I love most about it. And that’s what inspired us to travel so much—because we see all these people from different parts of the world, and you talk to them, and they tell you about their country, and you just want to go and experience it firsthand.

—  —  —

Watch for new Fashion Week coverage from Street Etiquette coming to
Men’s Shop Daily 
soon—and catch up on their dispatches from last season here.

And, if you’re in the NYC area this Saturday, September 7, stop by
Street Etiquette’s Slumflower gallery show at TEMP Art Space in TriBeCa.

—  —  —

Shop: Street Etiquette’s favorite items
Read more: Style Profiles

ATTENTION MEN (and women, too, if you’re reading this. Hi.)—you’ve got TWO DAYS LEFT to shop ANNIVERSARY SALE. To recap: This is a sale unlike any other, in which you can pick up killer Fall items, ahead of schedule, at limited-time discounts BEFORE they hit the floor at full price. Prices go up Monday, 8/5, so make the most of this weekend.

To help you navigate the sea of fantastic Anniversary items we brought in this year, we asked five men at Nordstrom HQ to curate a series of Expert Picks. And here on the blog, we’ve been shedding some light on the inspirations that make the men—and, presumably, inform their Picks. Read previous posts here and here.

Today’s entry is yours truly, Justin Abbott, senior editor of Men’s Shop Daily. Shop all my picks here, and read my rants, raves, and random thoughts below. [Note, there is, in fact, a second human on the other side of that interview: our talented men's e-commerce writer, Laura. Not that I'm above talking to myself at times.]


[A page from Take Ivy, the definitive volume on mid-century collegiate
style in America, shot by four dudes from Japan in 1965.]


[L: Steve McQueen, tux elegantly askew. | R: McQueen, not afraid to get his
hands dirty (nor his Barbour jacket).]


[L: Off-duty Gosling. T-shirt + peacoat = 'hey girl.' | R: Ryan Gosling shows how to keep a low
profile at the airport. Note the lack of sweatpants.]


[One of the best of the best street-style photos from our Street Etiquette x Nordstrom New York Fashion Week coverage.]


["If it bleeds, we can kill it." Predator uno, 1987.]

MEN’S SHOP DAILY: Your number-one style icon?
SENIOR BLOG EDITOR JUSTIN ABBOTT:
“Trick question! I think it’s not possible (or not advisable) to have just one. Ideally, a person has a wide mix of influences and experiences that forms you into a unique individual, style-wise and otherwise. That said, my favorites are mid-century Ivy League students, for the way they wore classic staples (blazers, chinos, button-downs, repp ties) in nonchalant and individualized ways; Steve McQueen because he looked tough and confident whether in a tux or covered in mud after a motorcycle race; and (though kind of expected) Ryan Gosling—but less DB-velvet-tux-on-the-red-carpet Gosling, more off-duty-in-a-rumpled-leather-jacket, T-shirt, messy-hair, on-a-date-with-Eva-Mendes Gosling. Extra points for his bleached-hair and face-tats period, even if it was just for a part.”

MSD: Where do you get inspiration for your posts on the Men’s Shop Daily?
JUSTIN ABBOTT:
“I just try to touch on everything men need to live life with style—from the awesome products our men’s buyers bring in, to classic rock, motorcycles, and how to open champagne with a sword.”

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[A couple wardrobe essentials, via Abbott's instagram feed.]

MSD: Which bloggers would you say are really killing it right now?
JUSTIN ABBOTT:
 “Another trick question. I think we’re in a phase where the Internet is simply a medium that allows interesting people to quickly and easily share what they’re up to. Meaning: These days, a “blogger” might be a journalist, a photographer, a stylist, an artist—or any mix thereof. That said, Joshua and Travis of Street Etiquette have topped my list for years now. My favorite curators of menswear-related information are How To Talk To Girls At Parties, Nickel Cobalt, and Eye Five Style. My favorite photographers with a large web presence are Liam Goslett, Evan Tetreault, Noah Emrich, and Tommy Ton. My favorite collectors of random inspiration online are JJJJound, Haw-Lin, Wit & Delight, Push The Movement.”

MSD: Your top picks for fall trends?
JUSTIN ABBOTT: “Tweedleather jacketsarmy green.”

MSD: All-time favorite movie. Only one. Your pick, and why?
JUSTIN ABBOTT: “I should probably say something smart like Kubrick or Kurosawa, but…Predator. You get buzz-cut Arnold in his ’80s prime, a treasure trove of classic/corny action movie one-liners, a slasher flick where all the characters are somehow likable—even the earliest ones to get offed, Carl Weathers’ severed arm still firing off machine-gun rounds as it hits the jungle floor, that mystical pessimistic guy Billy, an actually pretty cool menacing soundtrack, and one of the extremely few sci-fi monsters whose eventual appearance lives up to the foreshadowing.”


SALE PICKS from Justin’s category. From left:
Patagonia vest | Billy Reid henley | G-Star Raw sneaker | Billy Reid leather jacket | Obey cap


Vince pea coat sweater | Jack Spade leather briefcase | Diesel jeans | Nordstrom trim-fit dress shirt | John Varvatos sportcoat
 

FOR MORE, SHOP:
ALL JUSTIN ABBOTT’S PICKS
ALL EXPERT PICKS
ALL MEN’S ANNIVERSARY SALE

 
 

[Interview by Laura Oxford. Steve McQueen photos via Life Magazine and TWW. Ryan Gosling photos via Socialite Life, here and here. Tweed jacket detail shot by Joshua Woods. Predator © 20th Century Fox, Gordon Company, Silver Pictures, Davis Entertainment. Individuals pictured do not endorse Nordstrom.]