Interview

Art Interviews Style

Jewelry Designer Faris Du Graf’s Minimalist Works of Art Make a Personal Statement

FARIS Large Ladyday drop earrings

Jewelry designer Faris Du Graf is a minimalist. “It’s ironic because jewelry is all about adornment and adding more. I am not ornate, but I make ornamentations.” Her jewelry line, FARIS, though stunningly crafted, does first appear clean and modern. But put it on and the gentle, rippling shape of the pendant necklace is lost to the austerity of the metal; the graceful Ladyday earrings appear mechanical and botanical. What is delicate, when worn, becomes a powerful fashion statement—and hardly what one would categorize as minimalist.

This harmony is Du Graf’s signature, which is equal parts rigid and soft, sculptural and organic. For Du Graf, striking the balance between opposites is a natural result of her design process, which demands she remain agile at all times. Ahead, Du Graf reminds us that when creating something from nothing, every movement is crucial and the finished result is rarely exactly what you thought it would be.

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Interviews Style

3×1 Founder Scott Morrison Gives Jeans the Couture Treatment

Skinny, selvedge, vintage, boyfriend: spoiled by choice, why is it we still find ourselves lost on the search for the perfect pair of jeans—ones that are durable, but figure flattering; give without stretching; versatile enough to dress up or down; in a classic wash that doesn’t bulge, tear or fade. Could such a thing even exist?

Scott Morrison thinks so—he’s the entrepreneur and denim enthusiast behind 3×1 (the name comes from the 3×1 Right Hand Twill—the traditional weave used for jeans). Formerly the founder of Paper Denim & Cloth and Earnest Sewn, Morrison has positioned himself as a denim demigod with the power to accentuate your backside with well-placed pockets, or elongate limbs with his signature raw hemline.

So we asked Morrison: What makes the perfect pair of jeans? Ahead, the designer explains how 3×1 is revolutionizing the way we shop by reminding us of the elegance of quality denim.

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Interviews Men’s Fashion Style

Treasure & Bond Stories | Stephen Kenn Builds Furniture & Community

When furniture designer Stephen Kenn and his wife Beks moved into their industrial loft on McGarry Street in downtown Los Angeles, the roll-up garage door—a holdover from the space’s furniture factory days—came with an unexpected perk. When it was up, says Stephen, “it made it really easy for people to walk in off the street and have coffee or hang out.”

And so Backdoor Coffee and Cocktail Club was born. One morning every month, Stephen opens the door and pours coffee for anyone happening by in the mood for a cup and a chat. And one Friday night a month, the door rolls open for artisan cocktails. But it isn’t just the free beverages that draw the crowds; people come for the conversations and connections.

We were drawn in, too. The authenticity and attitude of the space (and its owner) made it the ideal scene for the spring 2018 Treasure & Bond campaign photo shoot. Plus, it came with a dreamy rooftop, gorgeous interiors and great conversation.

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Fashion Week Interviews Style Video

Rag & Bone’s Marcus Wainwright Shifts Our Perspective in the Short Film, “Why Can’t We Get Along”

The brand rag & bone is a story of contrasts: English tailoring meets American workwear, uptown versus downtown, masculine and feminine—all told to customers around the globe. Sartorial storytelling is the brand’s niche, and is often led by CEO and founder Marcus Wainwright, who continually finds new mediums for his evolving fashion message.

We spoke to Wainwright ahead of his new short film (co-directed by Benjamin Millepied, Aaron Duffy, and Bob Partington and filmed by Darius Khondji), which showcases rag & bone’s Spring/Summer 2018 collection. The short, “Why Can’t We Get Along,” features dance as a metaphor for seeing from another’s point of view, and stars Kate Mara and Ansel Elgort, in addition to the label’s spring styles and a soundtrack by Thom Yorke. 

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Art Fashion Week Interviews Men’s Fashion Music Style

Death to Tennis’s Theatrical Reintroduction and Fall ’18 Collection, at New York Fashion Week: Men’s

Photos by Mike Chard

Death to Tennis is not a brand Nordstrom sells yet, but one we’re following closely. Specializing for the past five years in classic menswear with urban and modern twists, designers Vincent Oshin and William Watson had only done presentations before (where models stand around in the clothes). They went all out for their first-ever runway show at Pier59 Studios, bringing music and theater, and reintroducing themselves as conceptual artists.

Their show, The Great Style War, used a soundtrack of drums that hit like bombs. First, it was hip-hop remixes played live by Asen James and DJ Prince. Then everyone watched (including famous rappers Joey Badass and Smokepurpp, who smoked a blunt in the front row), as men and women models walked to more frenzied beats, in floral jacquards and a preponderance of utility pockets.

In the third act, lights dimmed and a bandaged bride strode out, followed by the lurch of an almost dead-looking groom. Violinist Jungwon Kim played Bach’s Partita No. 2. The effect was transporting. What was this story of damage and desire?

Backstage, we caught up with Oshin and Watson to ask about the collection and show—which feels like a turning point for the brand.

SHOP: men’s designer

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Fashion Week Men’s Fashion

Todd Snyder’s Fall ’18 Collection and Post-Athleisure Vision

Photos by Mike Chard

Over the years,  Todd Snyder has become one of the marquee designers at New York Fashion Week: Men’s—a chill, Midwestern guy and a reliable player in both the designer world and in daily-use sportswear. While he doesn’t get much credit for it, he’s also a trendsetter. His long-running collaborations with Champion, for instance, preceded fashion’s fascination with athleisure. So when he speaks on the future of menswear, we listen.

Backstage moments before his Fall ’18 show, in between making last-minute adjustments to models’ outfits and chatting with his friend Hasan Minhaj, Snyder told us that he envisioned athleisure waning. According to Snyder, it’s not that sweats and sneakers are out, period, but at this point we have an issue of saturation. And his idea about how to break that up is for guys to start wearing classic British styles with loose American tailoring.

SHOP: Todd Snyder

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Tabula Rasa Interviews Style

Tabula Rasa’s Worldly Wool Sweaters for Your Winter Travels

Emily Diamandis founded Tabula Rasa in 2013 on the philosophy of comfort and self-expression. Like adding color to a “blank slate” (the translation from Latin of “tabula rasa”), her pieces encourage women to make their mark with clothing as their palette for expression. Diamandis’s eclectic take on knitwear speaks to this modern Tabula Rasa woman, who is “fun, playful and feminine,” Diamandis says. “She’s always on the move and it’s important that her clothes fit into her lifestyle.” 

Tabula Rasa takes a page straight from Diamandis’s own life as a journey-woman, who makes her home around the globe. “It can’t not be influenced by my personal style,” Diamandis admits of the bohemian aesthetic of her collection. “It’s a part of me.” Inspired by her Bangladeshi heritage, Diamandis’s passion for textiles started at a very young age. She honed her skills practicing centuries-old textile traditions in Nepal, Cambodia and Japan, before making New York City her home base. Her career blossomed from her interests: notably she launched knitwear at rag & bone before going on to consult for Uniqlo and Altuzarra. 

True to its global roots, Tabula Rasa’s Resort 2018 collection is inspired by the pageantry of Flamenco and the opulent textiles of the Mughal Empire. It plays with proportions, fringing and crochet to create one-of-a-kind knitwear unlike any other sweater.

We spoke with Diamandis to learn where she draws her inspiration from and what personal style means to her.

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Interviews Style

Andrew Rosen Holds Fashion Accountable with Good Wool by Theory

Dedicated to creating clothing that lasts—in terms of both fashion and quality—Theory’s latest innovation involves crafting clothing that is better for our planet. Good Wool by Theory raises the bar with a novel approach to fashion manufacturing that is elegant, effective and environmental.

Cofounder and CEO Andrew Rosen is heading this shift with the label’s most sustainable fabric to date. The line’s new colorful wool suits start with wool that is humanely sourced on the rural island of Tasmania, and then ecologically manufactured in Italy using renewable resources. Even the hangtags are made with recycled paper. Good Wool is just the beginning for Theory and Rosen, who has plans to make the label fully sustainable. We spoke to him about this eco-friendly enterprise, his vision for Theory and what the future holds for fine, sustainable fashion.

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The Beauty Chef Beauty Interviews Skin Care

Gut-Based Beauty with The Beauty Chef

If you want that outer glow, first you need to go within. New Age hot air, this isn’t. It’s science. A balanced, healthy gut is key to radiant skin, as The Beauty Chef founder Carla Oates will tell you. (We know because she told us.) Her line of supplements, formulated with fermented organic ingredients that promote gut health, expands the definition of skin care beyond serums and creams. You’ll want to heed her wisdom on beauty foods, bio-fermentation and the power of good bacteria. It’s downright enlightening, and skin-brightening.  

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alice + olivia Interviews Style

Stacey Bendet of Alice + Olivia Tells a Tale as Old as Time

Alice + Olivia’s fall collection tells a story. “I was inspired by Salman Rushdie’s book The Enchantress of Florence,” says Stacey Bendet, the creative director and mastermind of the label. Rushdie’s book, which takes place between Renaissance Florence and Mughal India, tells the story of a woman forging her own way in a man’s world. Bendet’s collection tells a similar tale with designs that perfectly capture the feminine-masculine dichotomy and the vibrancy of the Italian Renaissance.

The fantasy and fable that has inspired Bendet’s line maintains her signature whimsy. Using vintage silhouettes, embellished fabrics and colorful prints, Bendet is true to her brand as she artfully interprets the conversation of female empowerment. Below, we caught up with the creative director to discuss the power of storytelling through design.

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