Q&A

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If you follow professional basketball on any level, you have witnessed the boldness of Russell Westbrook, he of the nasty crossover and risk-taking personal style. Like Dwyane Wade (whose Stance socks we love), Westbrook has two lives: athlete and fashion conversation starter.

He just stepped out as a serious collaborator with True Religion, designing a strong collection of tapered jeans and long, eminently layerable shirts. They look good on the Internet but there’s a solidness and soft feel to the pieces that comes through in person.

We caught up with Westbrook on the phone to talk about all that–as well as his fashion industry goals and why he’s not interested in designing a basketball uniform.

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Shop: Russell Westbrook x True Religion

Related: The History of True Religion and Hip-Hop

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Rob Lowe with his therapist on The Grinder, Maya Rudolph

We remain inspired by Rob Lowe, the film and TV icon who has somehow found time to become a serious player in men’s skincare and fragrance while working on four TV shows: Moonbeam City, the Lion Guard, You, Me & the Apocalypse and The Grinder (so apropos).

With Rob’s self-care brand Profile now offering its debut scent, “Amber Wood 18,” exclusively at Nordstrom, we got on the phone and chatted about the details of the fragrance, regrettable colognes from the 1970s and what it means to be truly successful in life.

Because Rob is the man of the people, you can conduct your own Q&A as well: in person March 18 at 5 pm in our Seattle flagship, or pose your question right now on Twitter by tweeting to @Nordstrom with #nordstromxroblowe, where you might get a video response.

Shop: Profile fragrance

Click here for our Q&A

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Collage by Donovan Nguyen; images by Avi Loud

Usually when you shop, you choose whatever quantity you want of a particular item. Not so with Foothills CA–the new Californian brand where there is only one of each thing.

That’s because Foothills, run by former skater Jonnie Henderson with J.P. Plunier, specializes in vintage. Particularly Native American, military and Western jewelry and gear–stuff which looks best mixed into modern outfits.

We spoke with Henderson and Plunier about their twisting paths in the vintage game, the unique cultural feedback loops connecting North American folk art with streetwear/style in Japan and Great Britain, and rejecting notions of vintage as old-timey dress-up.

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Shop: Foothills CA | Heartbreakers II

Click here to read the conversation

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Images + captions by John Moore

Competitive surfing legend Kelly Slater is now riding the menswear wave as an entrepreneur with Outerknown, the new casual-luxe brand he founded with designer and surfer John Moore which is part of our Heartbreakers II Pop-In Shop.

And he’s considering the health of our planet every step of the way.

The unofficial Outerknown motto is “we don’t expect what we don’t inspect”, which is how Slater and Moore ended up in a chemical plant last year in Ljubljana, Slovenia, analyzing reclaimed fishing nets being processed into ECONYL® nylon yarn–the basis of Outerknown’s swim trunks.

Outerknown is part of the Kering conglomerate which includes Saint Laurent and Balenciaga, and can be seen as a blend of that luxury world with a brand like Patagonia, built on values of sustainability and transparency about its supply chain.

Moore says on the factory floor in Slovenia is when the “first day” of the company truly occurred, surrounded by weird smells and industrial waste. There, he and Slater faced production costs in a very real way and decided they were all in.

Here’s that story in a Q&A with Moore and Slater.

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Shop: Outerknown | Heartbreakers II Pop-In@Nordstrom

Click here for the story

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Images by Canh Nguyen

We love Maiden Noir‘s streetwear-meets-menswear style, which can be borderline dressed-up and also extremely cozy, with a deft use of polar fleece. We’re psyched to carry the Seattle brand as part of Heartbreakers II, our Pop-In Shop this month focused on evolving menswear, curated by VP of Creative Projects, Olivia Kim.

So psyched, in fact, that we commissioned an exclusive reversible fleece jacket and fleece hat for the occasion.

Because Maiden Noir is based in Seattle’s International District, just a mile south of Nordstrom HQ, we thought we’d pop in for a visit. After all, how busy could designer Nin Truong and his partner Christa Thomas be? They only run Maiden Noir simultaneously with a coffee shop, a line of bags and Truong’s other job as design director of Stüssy.

They’re a power couple, for real.

Shop: Maiden Noir | Heartbreakers II

This way for the Q&A + studio tour

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Shop: Études Studio

As part of our deep dive into the world of Heartbreakers II—our Pop-In Shop focused on evolving menswear curated by Olivia Kim, VP of Creative Projects—we got to know the brands with a quick interview.

For the format we chose a handwritten questionnaire, which should delight fashion graphologists worldwide (we see you).

Check our Q&As below with designers and creative directors from an international selection of the Heartbreakers II roster: Études Studio, BEDWIN & THE HEARTBREAKERS, Maiden Noir, LONGJOURNEY, Kinfolk, Needles, NIKBEN, Stutterheim, XLARGE, Xander Zhou, Tim Coppens and COTTWEILER.

We think you will find they are rich texts.

And you’ll notice one question is about music. Songs mentioned are compiled here.

Shop: Heartbreakers II

Click here to meet our designers by hand

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Images by Shawn Brackbill

The most anticipated show at New York Fashion Week: Men’s was by Public School, the subtly avant garde brand designed by New York City natives Dao-Yi Chow (L) and Maxwell Osborne (R).

Their Autumn/Winter 2016 collection was fascinating and seemingly inspired (to us, anyway) by Cowboy Bebop and Kung Lao from Mortal Kombat. Our ace photographer friend Shawn Brackbill was on the scene and summed it up thusly:

“Public School’s show was off-site, unlike the rest of the shows, and it was almost off-putting until I realized what was going on. They were bringing the public into it. It was an inside/outside thing. They had these big windows so people outside on the sidewalk could see the styling, see all the models getting ready. Then the models would come out and actually walk in the street, walk around the block, and then go back inside where they did a more formal runway show. That’s where all the heavy-hitter people were, everyone on the official guestlist. Then each model came back outside for a finale lineup, on the street.”

See images from the show below (and see Brackbill’s full clip of #NYFWM photos here) along with a streamable soundtrack by Twin Shadow, who always scores Public School’s live events with experimental grooves.

Shop: Public School

This way for fashion in the streets

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Images by Shawn Brackbill

The report from our man Shawn Brackbill, photographer extraordinaire, on the Todd Snyder show for Snyder’s Autumn/Winter 2016 collection at New York Fashion Week: Men’s:

“The music was The Smiths, ‘How Soon is Now,’ but an extended remix so the vocals came in really late. They had a lot of guys; a lot of looks. This show was one of those that felt like a bombardment of looks. The collection was expansive; lots of layers, lots of turtlenecks. It was beautiful and everything looked really wearable.”

Snyder, if he’s a new name to you, is one of the best American menswear designers working today, an Iowa-bred master of casual and business-casual looks with a vaguely collegiate aesthetic.

Check out Brackbill’s behind the scenes shots below (and all his #NYFWM stuff here), interspersed with our interview with the man himself, Mr. Todd Snyder.

Shop: Todd Snyder

This way for Todd Snyder images + Q&A

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Image and animation by Elizabeth Rudge

To better consider Brooklyn Brew Shop’s beer making kit–which we love and will be demonstrating on this blog in the near future–we asked a professional brewer to give it a test drive.

Our friend Andy Arguelles at Two Beers Brewing Company, which is right down the street from our photo studio in Seattle, said he’d give it a whirl. After he played around with Brooklyn Brew Shop’s kit for a few days, we called him and asked what he thought.

Here’s Andy on the beer kit, his favorite parts of the brewing process and which beers to pair with meals you will almost certainly cook/eat this week.

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Shop: Brooklyn Brew Shop

Hit this link for the Q&A

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7 For All Mankind designer Steve Romero and president Barry Miguel; image courtesy 7 For All Mankind

The challenge was simple: make a pair of jeans that don’t shrink in the dryer. Because you know how jeans are, right? You wash and dry them, they get tighter.

That shrinkage, however endemic though it would seem to all cotton-based garments, was unacceptable for 7 For All Mankind designer Steve Romero and president Barry Miguel.

Two years later—20 prototypes, 150+ dryer trials and 1 winning recipe for the weave and the yarn—enter FOOLPROOF Denim, 7 For All Mankind’s newest innovation.

We got on the horn with Miguel for a FOOLPROOF overview and with Romero for a drilled-down conversation about what they’re calling the best denim ever.

Shop: 7 For All Mankind

Let’s pop the hood on these jeans, shall we?

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