It’s Personal

In this series, we talk to artists and designers about their most personal works and the projects that are closest to their hearts.

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Nordstrom photographer Barb Penoyar is back with the second installment of her series In/On White: portraits of models shot using 100% natural light. We are feeling her new work. See round one here.

Barb works on this project in her free time at our Studio N, in between shooting Complete Looks for our website. Why? Because as a pro photog and photography teacher, she loves the creative challenge posed by shooting with sunlight. Learn more about that here.

And for winter/spring, she’s just really into white.

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In this series, we talk to artists and designers about their most personal works and the projects that are closest to their hearts.

Shout out to Dej Loaf: there’s just something godly about rocking white.

We’re especially feeling that vis-à-vis these recent portraits of model Magor M’Bengue by Nordstrom Senior Photographer Barb Penoyar–portraiture being something she does in her free time, after she’s shot the looks that our in-house Studio N needs for the day. Her current theme is In/On White. Expect to see more of Barb’s portraits on this blog, all shot with 100% natural light.

“This ‘In/On White’ thing might evolve over time,” she says, “but for spring I’m inspired by white on white.”

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In this new series, we talk to artists and designers about their most personal works and the projects that are closest to their hearts.

How does an aspiring fashion photographer who shoots Santa photos at Nordstrom transition to award-winning fine art photographer in just five years? For Santa Fe–based Zoe Marieh Urness, the journey has been a storied one. Since April of this year, Urness, who is Tlingit and Cherokee, has been traveling the western United States, shooting the ceremonies, dances and regalia of Native Americans for her ambitious photo series, Native Americans: Keeping the Traditions Alive. Using her art to help preserve the traditions of indigenous people, she produces photos that serve to connect the old ways to the modern-day realities of the Native world.

The importance of passing on tradition through storytelling, dance and song is deeply ingrained in Native American life, and Urness has managed to not only participate in this sacred heritage in a stylish and contemporary manner, but through her diligent documentation is sharing the ways of those whom she honors with a wider audience. Gaining traction largely through word of mouth, the series has grown organically and exponentially as one subject leads Urness to the next, and what began as a solitary endeavor has blossomed into a communal effort, unconstrained by tribe or borders.

We spoke with Urness about Keeping the Traditions Alive to get a deeper sense of the adventures she’s encountered, as well as how this endeavor has impacted her personally.

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