Pop-In @ Nordstrom

barbarian-bartool

Shop: Barbarian bartool | all drinkware | Father’s Day gifts: home & bar

We already got into drinking with dignity. Now let’s go further down that track with a related Father’s Day gift idea.

One bar tool to rule them all. A civilized implement called the Barbarian.

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Here we have a little behind-the-scenes action from the photo shoot for Magic Hour, our new Pop-In@Nordstrom. For the uninitiated, Pop-Ins are recurring boutiques curated by our director of creative projects Olivia Kim, which exist in selected physical Nordstrom locations and of course online.

Magic Hour refers to the time at a music festival when the sun sets and tame gives way to turnt. Snapshots and a detailed statement from Olivia are below.

Shop: Magic Hour Pop-In@Nordstrom

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britpop

converse andy warhol

Britpop lives forever! Or at least it lives again, as the inspiration for our current Pop-In@Nordstrom, the recurring shop curated by Nordstrom Director of Creative Projects Olivia Kim. Topshop and Topman are the focus. Britpop is the official soundtrack.

While there’s a fine line between classic and played-out, some Britpop gems from the ’90s hold up exceptionally well, and even massively overplayed hits can be made new again if you switch up your context. To that end, we spoke with Topman Design Director Gordon Richardson while simultaneously watching the two most crucial music videos of Britpop: Pulp’s “Common People” and Blur’s “Parklife”–that’s Blur, the band currently reuniting after a 12-year hiatus.

This is the “Parklife” blog post.

Here is the “Common People” blog post.

Click play on the video and then follow along below. It’s like directors’ commentary.

Sort of. 

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converse andy warhol

converse andy warhol

Britpop lives forever! Or at least it lives again, as the inspiration for our current Pop-In@Nordstrom, the recurring shop curated by Nordstrom Director of Creative Projects Olivia Kim. Topshop and Topman are the focus. Britpop is the official soundtrack.

While there’s a fine line between classic and played-out, some Britpop gems from the ’90s hold up exceptionally well, and even massively overplayed hits can be made new again if you switch up your context. To that end, we spoke with Topman Design Director Gordon Richardson while simultaneously watching the two most crucial music videos of Britpop: Pulp’s “Common People” and Blur’s “Parklife.”

This is the “Common People” blog post.

Click play on the video and then follow along below. It’s like directors’ commentary.

Sort of. 

[continue reading…]

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We agree with Herschel Supply Company that there is a virtue in being truly #wellpacked, and documenting it. Because at some point while adventuring you might need to play some cuts (shout out to Bluetooth deejays). Because you never know when you’re gonna need to Gift & Go. And because cold days are way better with a flask.

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Left: Herschel Supply Co. Pop Quick Buffalo Check Backpack | Best Made Co. Waxed Canvas Travel Zip Case 

Middle: Shwood Canby 54mm Wood Sunglasses | LSTN The Bowerys Cherry Earbuds | Graphic Image ‘Bottoms Up’ Flask | Kiehl’s Ultimate Strength Hand Salve | Woolrich Rugby Strip Merino Wool Blend Socks | Dean & Deluca Roasted Salted Cashews | Areaware ‘Eye Hide’ Small Wooden Container | Alexander Olch Pocket Round | Pokket Mixer Mini DJ Mixer | Jack Black Mr. Fix-It Antimicrobial Wound Rescue 

Right: Faribault Woolen Mill Royal Carefree Stewart Plaid Wool Throw | Herschel Supply Co. Network Large Canvas Pouch | Best Made Co. Cap of Courage Knit Wool Beanie 

Image by Brooklyn Benjestorf

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The next evolution of our custom-curated Pop-In Shops is now live online and in selected stores. In stark contrast to our previous Pop-In, French Fling, which was a wistful homage to Gainsbourg ballads and Godard films, this one is more like a monstrously cool mash-up of a mad scientist’s laboratory and 1982 sci-fi epic Tron.

Read More >

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These French flag-themed New Balance 574s were made in the USA especially for our French Fling Pop-In Shop in extremely limited numbers—and there’s a decent chance we still have them in your size! But not for long. As the wise man who writes our product pages stated, they’re “more rare than an Henri Jayer Pinot Noir, and pair a heck of a lot better with shorts.”

Grab your tri-colors while you can, whether you care to show your allegiance to liberté, égalité and fraternité—or just want to out-class the world’s foremost street-style stars. (Sneakers this chic go with everything from turned-up dad jeans to tailored suits these days, don’t you know.)

SHOP ALL:
FRENCH FLING POP-IN SHOP 
MEN’S SNEAKERS 

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French singer, songwriter, poet, composer, artist, actor and director Serge Gainsbourg was kind of like the Kanye West of his time—you know, a creative genius. A jack of many trades. A genre-hopping musician, both in the spotlight and behind the scenes. His lyrics utilized styles of wordplay that would make most rappers (and even self-described word-nerd copy editors—we checked) scratch their heads. (Mondegreen? Spoonerism? Check Gainsbourg’s Wikipedia page for definitions.)

Gainsbourg also managed to sweep some of the best-known bombshells of the 1960s and ’70s off their feet. Check out his 1968 ‘Bonnie and Clyde’ duet with then-ladyfriend Brigitte Bardot above, for example. The song is based on a poem entitled The Trail’s End, written by Bonnie Parker herself just weeks before her Depression-era crime spree with Clyde Barrow came to a grisly end. Gainsbourg’s apparent fascination with American culture is interesting—especially as we find ourselves paying homage to all things French, with our limited-time French Fling Pop-In Shop. (And, as Monsieur West is zealously requesting croissants and collab’ing with minimalist French label A.P.C.)

Below, find some favorite photos of Gainsbourg and guests—all via the essential repository for all things vintage and jaw-dropping: The Impossible Cool.


Perhaps he was not classically handsome. And legend has it that he passed out drunk after taking Jane Birkin to some questionable venues on their first date. But what Gainsbourg lacked in other areas, he made up for in his keen ability to wear a suit like he was born in it. Check out those fitted shoulders, wide lapels, and devil-may-care shirt collar.


Brigitte Bardot, Gainsbourg’s partner in crime in the song above, cleaned up pretty nice, too.


…But who wore it best? Invented in England, perfected by the French—Gainsbourg makes a trench coat look almost as good as Bardot. Note his expert use of accessories: gloves, smoke, icy stare.


Not a bad run: After breaking up with Bardot, Gainsbourg rebounded with English singer/actress Jane Birkin—but’s that’s a whole other story. Here, he rocks the “jacket-as-cape” look about 40 years before the current crop of street-style stars attempted it.

 

SHOP: FRENCH FLING POP-IN SHOP
READ MORE: FRENCH-THEMED ARTICLES

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Parisian photographer Guy Bourdin (1928–1991), a protegé of surrealist Man Ray, is widely credited with changing the face of fashion photography.

Utterly subverting the chipper sales pitches that dominated 1950s advertising, Bourdin’s work was moody, mysterious, alluring, aloof. The scenarios he concocted invariably raised more questions than the fleeting moments he froze could answer. And while we may never understand the exact pathos the troubled artist was trying to decipher (as one collaborator suggested, “What Guy did was conduct his own psychoanalysis [in the pages of] Vogue”)—studying 98 of his rare Polaroid test-shots at length in your living room can’t hurt.

Buy the book below, as part of our French Fling Pop-In Shop—and dive deeper into Bourdin’s infamously strange life at Vogue.com.

SHOP:
– GUY BOURDIN ‘POLAROIDS’ BOOK
– FRENCH FLING POP-IN SHOP

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You can talk Star Wars and Scarface for days—but are you fluent in French New Wave? For a primer on the genre that will score you more conversation points with girls (or guys) who wear glasses, check out our previous post on the topic—and to rep your favorite Jean-Luc Godard film wherever you go, pick up the Vivre Sa Vie snapback seen above.

It’s one of three custom New Era hats brought in exclusively for our French Fling Pop-In Shop. The title of the 1962 film translates directly as To Live Her Life, but it was released to American audiences as My Life to Live—an aptly self-assured headwear sentiment whether you’re lightening the vibe at a cheese tasting or out-classing your friends in a game of pick-up basketball.

We’ll gloss over the seedy details of the film’s plot line (no spoilers!), but do check out the classic jukebox scene in the clip above—and keep watching until the end, for a pick-up line that would never work in a million years. Unless, maybe, you’re French. Or wearing a great hat. But still, we don’t recommend it.

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To purchase a top-of-the-line edition of Vivre Sa Vie on DVD or Blu-Ray—and for more in-depth film reviews, essays, and photo galleries than you can shake a baguette at—visit The Criterion Collection.

 

SHOP ALL:
FRENCH FLING POP-IN SHOP 
MEN’S HATS 

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