Store Visits & Events

During last week’s Nordstrom Men’s Shop x GQ Magazine fall fashion show (benefiting the Detlef Schrempf Foundation for kids in need), we had the distinct pleasure of catching up with Mr. Schrempf himself—as well as a few local celebrities, who were good enough sports to brave the runway themselves in the name of a great cause.

Read their words of wisdom below—and see our exclusive backstage photos here.

DETLEF SCHREMPF—Philanthropist; Retired NBA All-Star.
[Pictured at left, with wife Mari, GQ’s Peter St. John, and Nordstrom men’s buyer Eric Akines.]

Men’s Shop Daily: How long did you play in the NBA?
Schrempf: “I played 16 years in the league, so that was a good career, but like everything else, life in sports ends sooner or later, so I’ve been fortunate to be in this market, and still have a strong presence with our foundation.”

MSD: What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?
Schrempf: “Clothes make the man? [Laughs.] I’d say knowledge is power. You can never take what’s in your brain, so keep stimulating your brain. Keep studying, keep reading, keep looking at different things.”

MSD: You mentioned you were out of the country recently—what were you doing?
Schrempf: “I was in Nigeria 24 hours ago. I just did a trip for the US State Department, so we did a diplomatic trip doing camps, clinics, visiting schools, orphanages, things like that.”

MSD: Could you say a few words about your organization, the Detlef Schrempf Foundation?
Schrempf: “This is our 20th year, so we’ve been around awhile. We’ve raised over 14 million dollars. Our mission is pretty simple. We want to support children in need, and children’s families in need, in the Northwest. We try to have a large impact on some of the smaller organizations that are very vital to our community, supporting kids and families that otherwise don’t really have that support. We’ve been fortunate to have really strong sponsors and supporters over the years, even after my playing days. Even with Nordstrom, we didn’t start this [yearly fashion show] until I was done playing, and this is our seventh year. So we just have great, loyal supporters, and great partners, and we’re fortunate in that regard.”

 

ISAIAH THOMAS—Sacramento Kings Point Guard; Former UW Husky.

Men’s Shop Daily: Any words for University of Washington fans reading this?
Thomas: “Go Huskies. I bleed purple. I love the Huskies.”

MSD: How was it walking on the runway tonight?
Thomas: “It was great. Definitely out of my comfort zone, but once I started walking, and I got a few cheers here and there, I felt like I was on the basketball court. It’s for a great cause—the Detlef Schrempf Foundation. [Detlef] is a great friend of mine—one of my mentors that stays on me throughout the season. He asked me to do it, and I didn’t even think twice.”

MSD: Any gym tips for guys at home?
Thomas: “The only exercise tips I do, other than playing basketball, is I’ll be on the treadmill and the elliptical. I don’t do too much more. I just try to stay a little fit—because I already eat bad. Fried chicken. Bacon cheeseburger and some fries. I eat fast food all the time! So I gotta stay in the gym.”

 

MYCHAL COHEN—Frontman of Seattle Band Campfire OK.
[Pictured at right, with guitarist Andrew Eckes.]

Men’s Shop Daily: Where did your band name come from?
Cohen: “I was learning how to tattoo. I was making little silly drawings, and one of ’em was a campfire, and underneath it I just wrote ‘OK’ for some reason, and it was really dumb, and I was like, ‘that’s so funny!’…and then I ended up tattooing it on my leg. The lady who was apprenticing me was like, ‘You should name your band Campfire OK.’ And I was like, ‘Maybe!’ And two years later, I did. I was like, ‘It doesn’t mean anything, it doesn’t make any sense, it sounds kind of ridiculous–let’s do it.’ I mean, band names are ridiculous in general. The Beatles? The Monkees? Pink Floyd? What the hell does that mean?”

MSD: What are you most excited about tonight?
Cohen: “I’m actually really excited to walk on the runway. It’s really cool. None of us have really walked on a runway before. Well, most of the good-looking guys have.” [The celeb guests appeared alongside pro male models.]

MSD: Any thoughts on the cause we’re here to support?
Cohen: “Yes, the Detlef Schrempf Foundation. As they say: They inspire hope for children. They do a lot of good things for children in need, and this is a really cool way to give back. It’s nice to be a part of a cool foundation, with a really cool guy, and his wife is really sweet, too.”

 

STEVEN HAUSCHKA—Seattle Seahawks Kicker.
[…who kicked a game-winner in overtime on Sunday! Nice one, sir. He’s pictured at left.]

Men’s Shop Daily: Any words for Seahawks fans at home?
Hauschka: “I mean, they keep bringing it, there’s not much else to tell ’em. They’ve been so great the past couple years, and that 49ers game was amazing, setting a world record. So the sky’s the limit.”

MSD: What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?
Hauschka: “Trust yourself.”

MSD: Is this your first time walking on a runway?
Hauschka: “No, actually, I did an equine fashion show two years ago—it was a horse fashion show. It was to benefit the Wounded Warrior Project, so it was a great cause. I was wearing some westernwear. It was in a stable, too.”

 

BRIAN CANLIS—Owner, Canlis Restaurant.

Men’s Shop Daily: We heard a few members of our team paid you a visit at your restaurant.
Canlis: “Yes, a whole group of them. There was like, eight or nine. It was so much fun—we went up on the roof and we hung out and took photos, trying not to fall off. Then we went in the wine cellar and drank whiskey in the middle of the day.”

MSD: Was this a work day?
Canlis: “That’s the beauty of the restaurant business—I get to drink and call it work, in the name of the profession! Your co-workers were quote-unquote ‘off work’ that day.”

MSD: What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?
Canlis: “What the heck?! [Thinks for a moment.] If you’re not growing, you’re dying. I think it’s really easy to stop growing, or to get stuck, or to stop taking risks. So I think to always push yourself, and to always lean out, outside your comfort zone. I’m actually going skydiving next week. Someone dared me, and I was like, ‘Yes! I have to do that.’ Because it’s growth, because it’s scary…and I don’t wanna do it. Actually in biology, scientifically, if you’re not growing, you’re dying. You’re either doing one or the other. So I think to always challenge yourself to keep learning is the most exciting thing to wake up to.”

MSD: What’s a kitchen essential every man should have?
Canlis: “A great copper pot. Spend money. Falk is my favorite. You should have a beautiful pot that always lives on your stove, not under, because A) it’s beautiful, B) it’s so beautiful you want to use it, and C) the best type of cooking is the cooking you do long and slow, over the entire day. So if you get a beautiful pot, you’ll want to fill it with delicious things. And when you cook long and slow, it’ll taste better—plus, your place will always smell great.”

 

MSD: What’s a meal you recommend cooking for a date?
Canlis: “Besides breakfast? No I’m just kidding. [Laughs.] Ham and eggs! My favorite is a little bit cheesy, but I like doing homemade pizzas. I like having it be interactive, not me cooking for her—but like, making the dough together, getting a whole bunch of ingredients, and being able to actually get your hands dirty. And you get to make individual, custom, miniature things, which is really fun.”

MSD: What was your favorite part about tonight?
Canlis: “I was shocked by the logistics. I had no idea that for a 20-minute show, there’s a thousand moving parts. I couldn’t believe it. I also didn’t know so many beautiful men could be in so small of a space at one time. And it’s really intimidating. It’s like being in the middle of the movie Zoolander, and not belonging. I kept asking other male models…working on my Le Tigre or my Blue Steel…So when I finally hit the runway, I just had to burst into laughter in total embarrassment. I couldn’t…I smiled like a small child receiving a bowl full of candy because I couldn’t be serious. But it was really fun. I mean, everyone is laughing and taking pictures. You’re supposed to stay serious during that? That’s the hardest work of a male model right there: not breaking a smile. I lasted about three seconds.”

MSD: Canlis restaurant has been in your family for a long time, right?
Canlis: “Sixty-three years. I started for my dad, washing dishes. I was bussing tables. And then he had me go work at other restaurants around Seattle. And then I left home for about 12 years, and I went all over the world, and I never thought I’d come home. But I was drinking whiskey, for breakfast, in Scotland, with my brother Mark, and he convinced me to come back to Seattle and run the company with him. I’m not quite sure how he did that, but I’m glad he did. That was about seven or eight years ago, and it’s been so much fun ever since.”

 

CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM OUR NORDSTROM MEN’S SHOP
x GQ FASHION-SHOW FUNDRAISER.

 
 

[Photos: Schrempf, Thomas and Canlis by Justin Abbott; Campfire OK via @campfireok on Instagram; Hauschka by Kirby Ellis. Interviews by Justin Abbott.]

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Last night marked a special occasion for the Nordstrom Men’s Shop, in collaboration with GQ magazine, and a charitable partner we’re honored to work alongside: The Detlef Schrempf Foundation.

Since 2006, Nordstrom has had the distinct pleasure of working with this inspirational organization (founded by former Seattle Supersonics basketball player Detlef Schrempf and his wife Mari) to put on yearly fashion shows—with 100% of ticket proceeds benefiting important children’s charities here in our hometown of Seattle. This year, we’re thrilled to say the event raised over $200,000 for local charities including Bellevue Youth Theatre Foundation and Inspire Youth Project.

Of course, beyond helping some amazing causes—the evening was a great chance to see some dapper fall clothes, enjoy a refreshment, and even see some local celebrities walk the runway. Read on for our exclusive photos from backstage to under the bright lights.













Left: Seattle Sounders midfielder Andy Rose.


Right: Mychal Cohen, frontman of Seattle band Campfire OK.


Campfire OK—who played live in our downtown Seattle store last year, and opened last night’s fundraiser festivities.







Guest models Michael Gspurning (left) and Andy Rose of the Seattle Sounders.


Sacramento Kings point guard, and former University of Washington Husky, Isaiah Thomas.

 

Huge thanks to the Detlef Schrempf Foundation, GQ, the models and special guests, everyone behind the scenes and everyone who attended. Cheers!

 
 

[Photos by Kirby Ellis. Check out his blog here.]

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ATTENTION MEN (and women, too, if you’re reading this. Hi.)—you’ve got TWO DAYS LEFT to shop ANNIVERSARY SALE. To recap: This is a sale unlike any other, in which you can pick up killer Fall items, ahead of schedule, at limited-time discounts BEFORE they hit the floor at full price. Prices go up Monday, 8/5, so make the most of this weekend.

To help you navigate the sea of fantastic Anniversary items we brought in this year, we asked five men at Nordstrom HQ to curate a series of Expert Picks. And here on the blog, we’ve been shedding some light on the inspirations that make the men—and, presumably, inform their Picks. Read previous posts here and here.

Today’s entry is yours truly, Justin Abbott, senior editor of Men’s Shop Daily. Shop all my picks here, and read my rants, raves, and random thoughts below. [Note, there is, in fact, a second human on the other side of that interview: our talented men’s e-commerce writer, Laura. Not that I’m above talking to myself at times.]


[A page from Take Ivy, the definitive volume on mid-century collegiate
style in America, shot by four dudes from Japan in 1965.]


[L: Steve McQueen, tux elegantly askew. | R: McQueen, not afraid to get his
hands dirty (nor his Barbour jacket).]


[L: Off-duty Gosling. T-shirt + peacoat = ‘hey girl.’ | R: Ryan Gosling shows how to keep a low
profile at the airport. Note the lack of sweatpants.]


[One of the best of the best street-style photos from our Street Etiquette x Nordstrom New York Fashion Week coverage.]


[“If it bleeds, we can kill it.” Predator uno, 1987.]

MEN’S SHOP DAILY: Your number-one style icon?
SENIOR BLOG EDITOR JUSTIN ABBOTT:
“Trick question! I think it’s not possible (or not advisable) to have just one. Ideally, a person has a wide mix of influences and experiences that forms you into a unique individual, style-wise and otherwise. That said, my favorites are mid-century Ivy League students, for the way they wore classic staples (blazers, chinos, button-downs, repp ties) in nonchalant and individualized ways; Steve McQueen because he looked tough and confident whether in a tux or covered in mud after a motorcycle race; and (though kind of expected) Ryan Gosling—but less DB-velvet-tux-on-the-red-carpet Gosling, more off-duty-in-a-rumpled-leather-jacket, T-shirt, messy-hair, on-a-date-with-Eva-Mendes Gosling. Extra points for his bleached-hair and face-tats period, even if it was just for a part.”

MSD: Where do you get inspiration for your posts on the Men’s Shop Daily?
JUSTIN ABBOTT:
“I just try to touch on everything men need to live life with style—from the awesome products our men’s buyers bring in, to classic rock, motorcycles, and how to open champagne with a sword.”

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[A couple wardrobe essentials, via Abbott’s instagram feed.]

MSD: Which bloggers would you say are really killing it right now?
JUSTIN ABBOTT:
 “Another trick question. I think we’re in a phase where the Internet is simply a medium that allows interesting people to quickly and easily share what they’re up to. Meaning: These days, a “blogger” might be a journalist, a photographer, a stylist, an artist—or any mix thereof. That said, Joshua and Travis of Street Etiquette have topped my list for years now. My favorite curators of menswear-related information are How To Talk To Girls At Parties, Nickel Cobalt, and Eye Five Style. My favorite photographers with a large web presence are Liam Goslett, Evan Tetreault, Noah Emrich, and Tommy Ton. My favorite collectors of random inspiration online are JJJJound, Haw-Lin, Wit & Delight, Push The Movement.”

MSD: Your top picks for fall trends?
JUSTIN ABBOTT: “Tweedleather jacketsarmy green.”

MSD: All-time favorite movie. Only one. Your pick, and why?
JUSTIN ABBOTT: “I should probably say something smart like Kubrick or Kurosawa, but…Predator. You get buzz-cut Arnold in his ’80s prime, a treasure trove of classic/corny action movie one-liners, a slasher flick where all the characters are somehow likable—even the earliest ones to get offed, Carl Weathers’ severed arm still firing off machine-gun rounds as it hits the jungle floor, that mystical pessimistic guy Billy, an actually pretty cool menacing soundtrack, and one of the extremely few sci-fi monsters whose eventual appearance lives up to the foreshadowing.”


SALE PICKS from Justin’s category. From left:
Patagonia vest | Billy Reid henley | G-Star Raw sneaker | Billy Reid leather jacket | Obey cap


Vince pea coat sweater | Jack Spade leather briefcase | Diesel jeans | Nordstrom trim-fit dress shirt | John Varvatos sportcoat
 

FOR MORE, SHOP:
ALL JUSTIN ABBOTT’S PICKS
ALL EXPERT PICKS
ALL MEN’S ANNIVERSARY SALE

 
 

[Interview by Laura Oxford. Steve McQueen photos via Life Magazine and TWW. Ryan Gosling photos via Socialite Life, here and here. Tweed jacket detail shot by Joshua Woods. Predator © 20th Century Fox, Gordon Company, Silver Pictures, Davis Entertainment. Individuals pictured do not endorse Nordstrom.]

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Last night outside our flagship store in Downtown Seattle, retired speed skater Apolo Ohnothe most decorated US Winter Olympian of all time—joined the likes of Jimi Hendrix, Quincy Jones, Ken Griffey, Jr., Bill Gates, and other highly esteemed Northwest natives, receiving his own plaque on our ‘Seattle Walk of Fame.’

While other plaques on the sidewalk surrounding our store depict imprints of our Walk-of-Famers’ shoes (a nod to Nordstrom’s origins as a shoe store), Ohno’s captures the motion of his ice-slicing skates:

Having won eight medals over the course of three Olympics, Ohno’s no stranger to high honors—nor avid fans, as was apparent from his easy demeanor in greeting an adoring public following the brief induction ceremony (which was hosted by none other than Pete Nordstrom, pictured up top on the left).

Before reading our exclusive Q&A below, check out a video of Ohno in action, gliding for Gold in a 1000-meter showdown decided by milliseconds. Come February, you can catch him in action again at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Russia—this time as an analyst with NBC Sports.

MEN’S SHOP DAILY: Having grown up here in Seattle, do you have memories of Nordstrom?
APOLO OHNO: “I have many memories of Nordstrom. My dad used to take me here shopping growing up, back-to-school stuff—and I shop at Nordstrom now. So it’s always been a part of my life. To know that it’s a Seattle-based company is awesome.”

MSD: What does it mean to be immortalized outside our flagship Seattle store?
APOLO OHNO: “It’s an honor, it really is. We have so many international tourists come through our great city all the time, and they see these people, and these footsteps. Some really amazing people have been cemented forever in history here, so for me to be named next to them—it’s an honor.”


[Ohno mingled with fans young and old after the unveiling.
Cool Quiksilver shirt, kid.]

MSD: You’ve accomplished a lot of amazing things in your life. What would you say has been your proudest moment?
APOLO OHNO: “The Olympic space, for me, is one that has always touched my heart, because it was the one single focus of my life for 15 years straight. It’d have to be the Olympic Games.”

MSDAs far as fitness and exercise—what training advice do you have for average guys at home?
APOLO OHNO: “Stick to the circuit training. Leave the slow cardio alone. We all don’t have a lot of time—I’d say on average, most of us have an hour or less in the gym. So just hit it hard. Always change up your routine, keep it fresh, keep it fun—and always challenge yourself.”


[How dapper is Ohno’s dad (center)?]

MSD: What are some of your personal style essentials (besides a skin-tight bodysuit)?
APOLO OHNO: “You always have to have a good jacket—a sports jacket, that fits—no matter what. You have to have a nice pair of shoes. Jeans and pants for me are always difficult, because my legs are so big—so they’re tight, even when they’re supposed to be baggy.” [Shop special sizes: Big & Tall]

MSDYou look sharp today. What are you wearing?
APOLO OHNO: “Let’s see…I’m wearing Armani. Zegna pants, Louis shoes.”


[One of many surprised passersby.]

MSDWhat’s your favorite thing about hosting the GSN game show Minute to Win It?
APOLO OHNO: “On Minute to Win It, the number-one thing is, I get to see people win real money. And the excitement you see, and the stories you hear about how that money’s going to change their life, or what they’re going to put it towards, are pretty amazing. We’ve seen people get married, we’ve had people want to put money towards a charity in memory of their brother, we’ve had ex-military people who served our country—there’s really an incredible array of stories on the show. So I’ve gotten to meet some really amazing people.

MSDWhat are you most looking forward to at the 2014 Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia—where you’ll be breaking down the action as a member of NBC’s broadcast team?
APOLO OHNO: “In 2014, I’m looking forward to short-track [skating]. All the speed skating events, that’s my favorite. I mean, I also love downhill events and skiing, but short-track, to me, is the ultimate. I’ll be there, every single day.”


[Our blog editor, asking the tough questions.]

MSD: You’re the most decorated Winter Olympian in US history. What advice do you have on being a gracious winner—and on your approach to life and work in general?
APOLO OHNO: “I definitely haven’t won every single race—so I know what it feels like when you don’t win, and I know what it feels like when you do. And I think you appreciate it that much more. I lived in a sport where you’re not guaranteed to win every single time, no matter how good you are. So when you do, and those medals get hung around your neck, it feels pretty amazing. And towards life? I’d say: Work hard, play hard, and just enjoy every single step of the way.”


[A plaque on the wall outside our flagship store, shedding light
on the ‘Seattle Walk of Fame’ installation.]



[A few of Ohno’s fellow Seattle Walk of Fame alums. Clockwise from top left:
Jimi Hendrix, Mariners legend Ken Griffey, Jr., Microsoft’s Paul Allen and Bill Gates, NBA great and former SuperSonic Lenny Wilkens.]

 

Special thanks to Apolo Ohno.
Follow him on Twitter here.

 
 
 

[Photos by Jeff Powell. Interview and first photo by Justin Abbott.]

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For the final weekend of Anniversary Sale, we’re partnering with on-call car service Uber to give Nordstrom customers a sweet deal on rides to or from your local store.

– New Uber users, use promo code NORDSTROM to save up to $20 –
– Existing Uber users, use promo code NSALE to save 10% –

Don’t know what Uber is? It’s basically a luxury chauffeur available in cities across the US, from Seattle to Atlanta, San Fran to Boston, and tons in between. Oh—and there’s an app for that.

We’re seeing this as your dapper designated driver for a weekend of style (and savings)—whether you’re pre-func’ing at your pad before an afternoon at the sale, or celebrating your successful haul of killer Fall finds with drinks at a Nordstrom Grill. But hey, to each his own. See details here.

 

3 DAYS LEFT! SHOP: MEN’S ANNIVERSARY SALE

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ANNIVERSARY SALE CONTINUES. Don’t wait too long, though—prices go up August 5. Previously, we showed what inspired the Expert Picks of creative director Andy Comer. Today, get to know tailored clothing buy planner Ryan Sharp, a man who’s as into Gucci loafers as he is video games. Shop Ryan’s picks here, and read more about him below.


[L: David Beckham—a baller in more ways than one.
R: The view from Bandits Bar, a Seattle spot famous for tamales.]

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[L: Ryan’s loafer game is strong. | R: John Slattery, aka Roger Sterling of Mad Men.
Not wearing his signature three-piece suit…but still.]


[How Ryan kicks up his Guccis and blows off some steam.]

MEN’S SHOP DAILY: Who’s your top style icon?
RYAN SHARP:
“I’d say David Beckham. From being casual courtside to formal on the red carpet, he’s always looking sharp. I’m not sure how much Posh has to do with it, but the looks he puts together are generally on point.”

MSD: Like many guys, you occasionally unwind at the end of the day with the Xbox. What are your current favorite games?
RYAN SHARP:
“Right now, I’m pretty into Borderlands 2. I rotate in Skyrim, Call of Duty, Dishonored and am always down for a round of FIFA. I’m looking forward to attending PAX Prime this summer, and I’ll hopefully get a chance to try out the Xbox One, PS4 and some upcoming games.”

MSD: What trends are you most excited about for fall?
RYAN SHARP: “I really like all the different patterns and textures for fall, the tweeds, corduroys, Fair Isle sweaters, etc. All the vested looks are really nice, too. Three-piece suits are very Roger Sterling—they’re definitely dressier and make a statement.”

MSD: How do you refuel in your time off?
RYAN SHARP: “When the weather is nice, I enjoy exploring the city, trying out new restaurants and bars. It does have a tendency to rain up here, so I also enjoy reading or playing Xbox at home (when can I get my Xbox One?).”

MSD: What brought you to the Seattle area?
RYAN SHARP: “I grew up in Orange County, California. My girlfriend moved up here for work; after I visited once, it was an easy decision to move up here, too.”

MSD: How would you describe your personal style?
RYAN SHARP: “Smart casual? I’ll wear a suit or a sportcoat with jeans to the office. Lately on the weekends, it’s normally my A.P.C.s and maybe a Todd Snyder shirt.”


A few of our favorites from Ryan’s Anniversary Sale picks (from left):
Joseph Abboud sportcoat | Santoni double-monk | Dockers slim chinos | Hugo Boss dress shirt

 

FOR MORE, SHOP:
ALL OF RYAN SHARP’S PICKS
ALL EXPERT PICKS
ALL MEN’S ANNIVERSARY SALE

 
 

[Interview by Laura Oxford. Instagram photos by Ryan Sharp. David Beckham photo via Esquire UK; John Slattery photo via GQ. Individuals pictured do not endorse Nordstrom.]

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Last week, we showed you the fruits of our labor during Seattle record label Sub Pop’s 25th-anniversary music festival—by way of some first-class Seattle street style. Today, we have a subset of those shots that our team wanted to present separately as a special report: Below, individuals who are doing their part to foster a new golden age of Seattle music.

Photos by Robin Stein (pictured above right). Words by Andrew Matson.

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Ian Judd. “Seattle’s vibey-est, smallest concert venue (and vintage store) is Cairo in Capitol Hill. Judd is the genius who books the music there. While he’s at it, he hand-picks some of the best bands for his label, Couple Skate (Naomi Punk, The Numbs, Weed). Basically, come to Cairo on any given Saturday night and see what will be happening next year in Brooklyn.”
[Pictured with a friend who looks kind of like this guy. Click small photos to enlarge.]



Larry Mizell, Jr. “It’s safe to say Larry is the voice of Seattle hip-hop. The host of weekly show ‘Street Sounds’ on Seattle’s crucial (and streaming worldwide) radio station KEXP, he’s also the columnist behind ‘My Philosophy’ in Seattle’s alt-weekly The Strangeran emcee in the band Don’t Talk to the Cops, and an artist manager. Fun fact: Mizell, Jr. is also the son and nephew of Larry and Fonce Mizell, legendary jazz-fusion producers.”


Erik Blood. “This is the guy who records your albums in Seattle, if you want someone who will actually vibe with you on your weird idea and bring it to fruition. As a bandleader, Erik Blood is a My Bloody Valentine devotee. As a producer he’s done hip-hop (Shabazz Palaces, THEESatisfaction), folk rock (The Moondoggies), and ‘swirl’ (Stephanie), to name a few. He also knows more about Prince than anyone else, ever.”



Sasha Morgan & Alex Kostelnik. “Sasha works in radio relations at Sub Pop and promotes concerts on the side. Alex runs 20/20 Cycle—a bike shop where pricing can sometimes be negotiated, and intimate concerts occur by Sub Pop-related acts including Mount Eerie and White Rainbow. As far as independent culture in Seattle goes, you’re looking at a power couple.” [Click small photos to enlarge.]

 

Nordstrom Men’s Shop was proud to co-sponsor Sub Pop’s 25th-anniversary Silver Jubilee celebration. Watch for continuing Sub Pop content in the days to come—and in the meantime, catch up on Silver Jubilee Street Style and our Top 5 Sub Pop Albums Ever.

 
 

[Text by Andrew Matson. Andrew writes about music and culture for publications including The Seattle Times, NPR, and The Stranger—follow him on Twitter here. Photos by Robin Stein—see more of Robin’s work here. Individuals pictured do not endorse Nordstrom. Intro photo by Melia McGee.]

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It’s that special time of year: Anniversary Sale. A time not only to revel in scoring new Fall items, at sale prices, ahead of schedule—but also a time to look back on our 100+ years of history.

Did you know that the first Nordstrom was a shoe store? John W. Nordstrom himself set up shop in Downtown Seattle in the year 1901. A century later, we’re still here in Seattle—and still family-operated.


[Our founder standing proudly in front of his first store, circa 1901. His partner’s name now graces our in-house, heritage-inspired brand, Wallin & Bros.
For more vintage photos, read our post on Nordstrom’s Illustrated History.]

Alright alright, enough reminiscing. Here are a few of our favorite fall steals on indispensable footwear—for the office, the gym, the bar, and everywhere in between. Find more Anniversary-Sale shoes here. Happy hunting.


Dressy Boots (L-R): To Boot New York (sale $259.90) | Bruno Magli (sale $319.90)
Allen Edmonds (sale $259.90)


Rugged Boots (L-R): Red Wing (sale $174.90) | Timberland Boot Company (sale $189.90)
Wolverine x Filson (sale $294.90)


Sneakers (L-R): Nike (sale $69.90) | Ald0 (sale $39.90) | Diesel (sale $89.90)


Monk-Straps & Loafers (L-R): To Boot New York (sale $277.90) | Allen Edmonds (sale $249.90)
Cole Haan (sale $149.90)


Wingtips: Cole Haan (sale $129.90) | Bruno Magli (sale $389.90) | 1901 (sale $64.90)

 

SHOP ALL: ANNIVERSARY SALE FOR MEN

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ANNIVERSARY SALE HAS BEGUN. Which means now’s your chance to score brand-new Fall essentials at great savings. Given the massive amount of stuff on sale, we decided to ask a few experts here at Nordstrom HQ for their insight on what ‘s new for Fall. First up, our Men’s Shop creative strategy director Andy Comer. Shop Andy’s picks here, and read about some of his inspirations below.

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[L: Andy proudly displaying his Danzig find. | R: A turtlenecked Phil Ochs.]


[L: Italian actor Marcello Mastroianni. | R: Andy in Thom Browne vs. Andre the Giant in a unitard. Who wins?]


[A classic shot from photographer Bruce Davidson’s 1959 Brooklyn Gang series.]

MEN’S SHOP DAILY: Your number one style icon—who is he (or she)?
ANDY COMER:
“If pressed, I’d say Marcello Mastroianni. But my reference points are always shifting. Right now, I’m really into Phil Ochs. Lots of knit ties, rumpled oxford cloth shirts, and turtlenecks worn under tweed sports jackets. And terrific records. Check out Tape from California.”

MSD: You recently released your solo debut album, Bloody Amateur. How would you describe it?
ANDY COMER:
“Candid. No over-arranging or unnecessary ‘parts.’ The sound is my own, inspired by the artists I like: PJ Harvey, Michael Rother, Brian Eno and Lou Reed, to name only a few.”

MSD: You clearly have a lot of love for the music scene in Louisville (your hometown). How are you liking the Seattle scene?
ANDY COMER: “You can really feel the richness of the scene’s history here; it reminds me of Cleveland (another of my favorite music towns) in that regard. I hit a great record fair called the Big Dig a couple weeks back and scored a Danzig bootleg 45 and a near-complete collection of The Lost Lennon Tapes. A good sign.”

MSD: Any fall trends you’re excited for?
ANDY COMER: “I’m excited about the new spin on classic English and university themes: tartan peacoats, slim tweed sportcoats, quilted vests and jackets in bold colors and patterns, all cut a little shorter than usual. Also the cool Bruce Davidson moto vibe that’s trickling into the mainstream: tough belts, knit hats, and leather jackets in styles that work for a wide range of men.”


A few of our favorites from Andy’s Anniversary-Sale picks (from left):
Hugo Boss cotton sportcoat | Frye wingtip boot | AG Jeans | Nordstrom Smartcare dress shirt

 

FOR MORE, SHOP:
ALL OF ANDY COMER’S PICKS
ALL EXPERT PICKS
ALL MEN’S ANNIVERSARY SALE

 
 

[Interview by Laura Oxford. Photos of Andy by Strath Shepard. Phil Ochs photo via; Marcello Mastroianni photo by Steve Schapiro, via; photo © Bruce Davidson via. Individuals pictured do not endorse Nordstrom.]

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Nordstrom Men’s Shop was proud to be part of our hometown’s history on Saturday, when we had the chance to co-sponsor Sub Pop’s Silver Jubilee, a 25th-anniversary celebration of the legendary Seattle record label. With the motto “Going out of business since 1988,” Sub Pop has found success and made history by following their collective gut instinct. It’s a way of doing things that we greatly admire—and think our founder John W. Nordstrom would have appreciated, too, when he set up shop in Seattle back in 1901.

Below, check out some crowd-sourced proof that it all really happened, via Instagram—and read an account of the day’s events by Seattle-based music writer Andrew Matson.


[Instagram photos: L by @babydeerie, R by @veronicanett.
Intro image by @_mayyyc.]

For Sub Pop Records’ massive 25th-anniversary Silver Jubilee—co-sponsored by Nordstrom Men’s Shop—the legendary Seattle independent music label shut down the Georgetown neighborhood of their home city, and about 20,000 people (my guess) came to give praises to Ra, the Sun God. It was hot as hell and we need that around here. (It rains a lot, not sure if you’ve heard.) We also raised an IPA to the label that brought us Nirvana.

From the looks on faces, Seattle loved it. Pounding music from three stages, ricocheting around a closed-off Airport Way, Georgetown’s main drag. It hurt in a good way.


[Instagram photos: L by @ylanag, R by @laurakstyle.]

Old-schoolers (and their kids) flocked to Mudhoney, who yelled lyrics about supporting independently owned businesses. Built to Spill soloed majestically, and a single dream was woven together between the Jubilee-goers, who experienced what only Doug Martsch can do with an electric guitar. Soundgarden did not perform—despite rampant rumors on Twitter that the Seattle icons, one of Sub Pop’s very first acts circa 1987, would play a secret late-night set.

Sub Pop president Jonathan Poneman and vice president Megan Jasper strolled the concrete like royalty. Founder Bruce Pavitt was everywhere, probably struggling to connect the day’s packed streets and epic performances to his humble Subterranean Pop fanzine from Olympia, Washington, back in the ‘80s.


[Instagram photos: L by @timbasaraba, R by @nclrmrz.]

It’s amazing what Sub Pop has done: Put its black-and-white stamp on grunge, on indie rock, and on alternative comedy (there was a Jubilee comedy showcase Friday at Seattle’s Moore Theatre, headlined by Eugene Mirman). None of that existed in a codified way before Sub Pop. But then again, some of the major businesses in Seattle (Starbucks, Microsoft, REI) started in people’s garages as a co-op, or in home offices as a start-up, addressing specific needs—and grew to be cultural icons. Maybe serving micro-communities is just the model here in the Pacific Northwest…and sometimes lightning strikes.


[Instagram photos: L by @scotteverett, R by @sarandipity2.]

So, what’s the next move for Sub Pop? What’s the next wave of music? There’s been no clear era-definition since the tail end of indie rock, with The Shins and Band of Horses. A handful of relatively newly-signed acts showed the way forward at the Jubilee. By my estimation, the future of Sub Pop sounds like:


[Instagram photos: L by @zlog, R by @sub_pop.
Click left image for a short video clip.]

Shabazz Palaces (L), the mbira-featuring Seattle hip-hop duo. They shared peeks at their upcoming album, and the new music was uptempo and dance-y. Their old music was ghostly and dirge-like. The balance was spiritual, microphone short-outs and all.

King Tuff (R), the real-deal Holyfield on electric lead guitar, possible savior of American rock. Tuff zoomed from one gem to the next, giving his set a mixtape-like feel. There was some Jeff Spicoli in there, a little Big Star, a sprinkling of Ramones. Perfect.


[Instagram photos: L by @sub_pop, R by @ponyboat.
Click right image for a short video clip.]

clipping. (L), a Los Angeles trio who makes ‘hip-hop’ in the most Throbbing Gristle sense of the word. Their emcee yelled about poverty and family drama. I realized in the moment that I feel a similar way about clipping. as I do about the TV show Homeland. I’m into it, but man, it’s tense.

Father John Misty (R), whose stage sound was mixed better than everyone else’s. His jam “Hollywood Forever Cemetery Sings” might just be eternal. It sounded amazing in the environment, singer Josh Tillman’s low tenor voice ringing through the industrial alleys of G-Town.

Hausu, four screaming, smartypants Reed College students, signed to Sub Pop’s tiny affiliate Hardly Art. They took a break to shout-out the Sub Pop band Screaming Trees, an influence. Singer Ben Funkhouser said he learned about the northwest band through the non-Sub Pop compilation album, Wild and Wooly: The Northwest Rock Collection.


[Instagram photos: L by @bloodyamateur, R by @henritmodefesta.
Click right image for a short video clip.]

On that note—young Pacific Northwest rockers digging the gnarly art of their forebears—I left Georgetown. It felt like the circle of life was complete, the next phase of Sub Pop coalescing between my ringing ears.

 

Stay tuned for much more Sub Pop Silver Jubilee content—
from band interviews to street style—in the days to come.

 
 

[Main text by Andrew Matson. Andrew writes about music and culture for publications including The Seattle Times, NPR, and The Stranger. Follow Andrew on Twitter here.]

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